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I know USB 3.0 Host & Device connector port has the same pin count (VBUS, D+/-, TX+/-, RX+/-, GND), but what is the difference between USB host & device when they are connected to the Intel PCH chipset?

I am using a USB3380 controller to convert the PCIe to USB device port. I would like to ask if there are any other controller out there which can replace USB3380. Texas Instruments TUSB7320? Renesas uPD720202? Cypress EZ-USB FX3? I know TI & Renasas chip are PCIe to USB host controller; can they be used for my purpose?

Lastly, without a USB3380 controller, can I connect/design the USB device port directly to a Intel PCH chipset?

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[W]hat is the difference between USB host & device when they are connected to the Intel PCH chipset?

The USB host is like the "master": it initiates all communications on the bus and manages all transactions. The host can communicate with all devices.

A USB device is like a "slave": it only responds when initiated by the host. A device can only communicate with the host controller.

In your application, the host is going to be the computer itself. The devices are going to be, well, the devices that you attach to it (in other words, the USB peripherals).

I would like to ask if there are any other controller out there which can replace USB3380.

Yes, of course there are other controller options. It sounds like controller that converts PCIe to USB would work for you. In order to help you to choose, we would need to know more details about your exact purposes or application. What are your requirements? What is your budget? What are your primary considerations? Et cetera.

Additionally, it's worth noting that Stack Exchange sites aren't really well suited as recommendation engines. You should be able to find other suitable devices just by searching the product inventory on a distributors' site, like DigiKey or Mouser. From there, you can obtain the data sheets for all controllers matching your requirements and compare them.

I would definitely recommend looking for an alternative to the USB3380 controller (unless you eliminate it entirely—see answer to next question), since it is, according to the manufacturer, no longer recommended for new designs. In other words, it is obsolete and is being phased out.

[W]ithout a USB3380 controller, can I connect/design the USB device port directly to a Intel PCH chipset?

Yes, (nearly) all Intel PCH chipsets include at least one integrated USB host controller, supporting multiple USB devices. Using this USB host controller directly makes far more sense to me than obtaining USB via a separate PCIe bridge, and would allow you to eliminate a superfluous component.

Check the datasheet provided by Intel for your specific PCH chipset family/model (e.g., here for the ICH 9 series) to determine how many USB host controllers it provides, how many USB devices are supported by each of those host controllers, which pins to connect, and how to make use of them via software.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you for your reply. I think you misunderstood my purpose of using USB3380. It was used to convert PCIE to a USB Client port (USB device). The Texas and Renesas controller converts PCIE to USB host which is not suitable for my purpose, I guess. I am designing a computer application (device) and it need to be controlled by a software on another computer (host). \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jan 9, 2020 at 6:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ Also, you mentioned that Intel PCH chipset provide the host controller and check the USB devices are supported by each of those host controllers. I checked the datasheet and it says that “This port also supports Dual Role Capability for USB On The Go”, so does it work if I design the USB device port directly to Intel PCH chipset without USB3380 controller? \$\endgroup\$ Commented Jan 9, 2020 at 6:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ USB OTG is a protocol, there is close to none OTG supporting devices on the market (neither Intel, nor anybody else). DR on the other hand is a mechanism how to detect (electrically, by measuring ID pin resistance) what kind of cable is being connected. DR in Intel implemented like this: xHCI (host) <--> USB MUX <--> DWC3 (device). There are few SoCs that have only DWC3 that provides host and device capabilities. \$\endgroup\$
    – 0andriy
    Commented Feb 15, 2020 at 11:49

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