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I have a narrow component with two rows of pins. The pins have the right pitch but the rows are too close together to be placed over the non-conducting gap between E and F rows of the breadboard. The distance between rows is only 3.2 mm. There are 5 positions on each side (1 pin, a gap, and then 3 more pins). It is Axicom minature relay.

What is the best, recommended practice to mount such a component? I consider:

  1. Solder extensions to the relay contacts. This would be a rather delicate work with the 2.54 mm spacing.
  2. Bend the pins, but they may get too short and do not go into the board deep enough.
  3. Try to disassemble the breadbord and have the two rows separated. I would like to know if possible at all before ripping it apart.
  4. Try some connector (which one?).
  5. Order another component for prototyping. But we will use this one in production.

Drawing of the relay I need to integrate can be found here.

Any other ideas? I would like to know how it is typically done with such components.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Are the pins long enough to be bent into a perfboard so that you can build a perfboard to breadboard adapter? Soldering 2.54 mm shouldn't be all that hard in my opinion. \$\endgroup\$
    – Arsenal
    Jan 8, 2020 at 10:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, I think it probably could be mounted on perfboard. \$\endgroup\$
    – h22
    Jan 8, 2020 at 10:32
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    \$\begingroup\$ I solved a very similar problem by using a bit of Veroboard and header pins to make an adapter. \$\endgroup\$
    – user253751
    Jan 8, 2020 at 11:58
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    \$\begingroup\$ ... or find pre-made SMD adapter board with suitable pitch and drill the holes for pins through SMD pads. Also, a link to "the component" is really helpful when asking questions like this. \$\endgroup\$
    – Maple
    Jan 8, 2020 at 12:08
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    \$\begingroup\$ That is why I suggested to drill holes through SMD pads of the adapter board to insert pins of your device from the other side. \$\endgroup\$
    – Maple
    Jan 8, 2020 at 15:29

3 Answers 3

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I found a very small stripboard that has two adequately spaced rows. I do not know the original purpose of these small boards, maybe really some kind of adapter. It even has tracks from each hole going rough till the middle, but only tiny pads very close to the center are exposed, making impossible to use them with relay.

I soldered pins into that board, making it to look like a chip. Then I have bent the pins of the relay into sides (making it from THD into kind of SMD that way) and soldered on the top. I tested all connections with the breadboard, works fine and also can be removed/placed back no problem.

enter image description here

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  • \$\begingroup\$ That's called a breakout board and it's typically used to adapt smd or non standard through hole spacing parts to standard breadboard or strip board spacing. \$\endgroup\$
    – Passerby
    Jun 10, 2021 at 2:22
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Use 2 straight pin headers and bend one (or both) and solder the relay on top of it (left picture).
Place the headers in the breadboard, bend the pins, solder the first pin and the last of the header to the relay.

Or use a straight header and a right-angled SMD header (like the SL 1X10W SMD2,54 ) (right picture).
The displacement of the pin at the top to the bottom pin is about 1.7 mm, so it would fit almost perfectly (2*2.54mm - 1.7 mm = 3.4 mm). Because you probably solder the pins not heart on heart, but next to each other, you will manage to bridge the remaining 0.2 mm.

To prevent breaking the solder joints, make sure when removing the relay from the breadboard to not hold and pull on the relay itself, but to hold and pull the pin headers.
Or use something like hot glue to fixate the header to the relay. enter code here

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Solder extensions to the relay contacts. This would be a rather delicate work with the 2.54 mm spacing.

Possible. If you do it upside down, it's a technique called dead bug soldering.

Bend the pins, but they may get too short and do not go into the board deep enough.

Depends on the lead length but this has a potential to break the part.

Try to disassemble the breadbord and have the two rows separated. I would like to know if possible at all before ripping it apart.

Yes you could. Breadboards are made of multiple sections of small U shaped clips. You could take a dremel or other rotary tool and cut a clip strategically to make 2 smaller sections. The quality depends on how fine your motor control and cutting tool is. Too thick and you'll likely ruin on of the five holes and you may not have the spacing you want.

Try some connector (which one?).

Depending on the lead length a dupont cable or test jumper wire with female to male connections may work. Or you need a smaller header for the lead to make good contact. Otherwise you can use smd test clips. These are prefect for little grabbers to tight spaces.

Order another component for prototyping. But we will use this one in production.

Using a different component is a bad way to prototype. For a relay it's not likely to matter much if the specs are the same but for ICs that may not be the case.

And your last option which you self answered. Make an adapter pcb from stripboard or pcb manufacturering or use/modify a breakout board that's sold online.

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