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I recently put together a keyboard and had an issue with a couple switches so I decided to re-solder. I resoldered 2 and that fixed the issues but for this last one I started smelling something different than the solder/flux heating up. I'm thinking it was the pcb/fiberglass, and then it seemed as though the through hole plate started to come up so I was possibly making it too hot trying to remove this switch.

I removed the functionality of this switch so the keyboard is useable. I was wondering though if anyone has experience dealing/fixing these kinds of mistakes. And if you had any possible solutions? I thought about trying to drill it out but didn't have a small enough bit on hand.

Definitely learned some things from this experience and got some proper soldering iron rosin flux, tinning compound and brass non-abrasive cleaner for next time.

enter image description here

Edit: temperature setting I had it at was 350 on the dial.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ It might be a help to edit and include your tip temperature setting - if there is one. \$\endgroup\$
    – Transistor
    Jan 9, 2020 at 13:36
  • \$\begingroup\$ A good tip to re-/desolder and you don't have flux is to first add more solder and then try to re-/desolder the component. It will go easier and avoids having to heat up the connection too much resulting in your picture. \$\endgroup\$
    – Swedgin
    Jan 9, 2020 at 13:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ Looks like too much heat and/or too long of a dwell time. I'd suggest a good desoldering tool with temperature setting. \$\endgroup\$
    – rdtsc
    Jan 9, 2020 at 14:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ Need to use flux... \$\endgroup\$
    – Voltage Spike
    Jan 9, 2020 at 18:20

1 Answer 1

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If you heat the board for too long, or get it too hot the material under the copper layer starts to burn and the copper gets loose. you were probably smelling the burning of the resin in the board.

this can be caused but soldering too slowly, not using enough flux, or the wrong temperature on the soldering iron.

if it's too cold it takes too long to make the joint and the board or the parts are damaged before the joint is completed. if it's too hot the flux burns up and makes it hard to make a good joint, same bad result.

try 370 next time, see if that's better.

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