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I have recently discovered that I am a very silly man. Despite this, for the purposes of laptop repair, I still want to ground myself without spending any more money.

I have recently come in to the possession of an anti-static band. However, I cannot clip it to any of my radiators or inside any of my plug sockets. In a moment of drunken clarity, I discovered that I am the owner of very many paperclips and that, despite my lack of knowledge of what they're made out of, said paperclips are attracted to magnets.

For the purposes of grounding myself, are paperclips conductive enough that it will be sufficient to tie paperclip(s) to a radiator and clip myself to said paperclip(s)?

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    \$\begingroup\$ @J: This series of questions is a little in the "bonkers" spectrum. You're repairing laptops but have never wired a 13A UK plugtop (from linked question) and now you're proposing a chain of paperclips rather than find a piece of wire. (You didn't even say whether they're bare metal or coated!) You have the solution in your previous question. The USB, video ports and charging socket will all have some exposed metal on the shell of their sockets which are connected to the internal chassis. Connect to that. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Jan 11 at 23:25
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Transistor That's actually a really good idea, thanks. I'll see if I can clip on to them. \$\endgroup\$ – J. Mini Jan 11 at 23:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ I think you summed up your series of questions when you mentioned "a moment of drunken clarity". The only problem is that you did not have clarity at that moment. You clearly have no business trying to repair any electronic device. \$\endgroup\$ – Elliot Alderson Jan 12 at 1:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ you're not trying to build a lightning conductor. \$\endgroup\$ – Jasen Jan 12 at 8:32
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    \$\begingroup\$ I'm voting to close this question as off-topic because it is very silly! \$\endgroup\$ – Leon Heller Jan 12 at 10:37
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Typically, the path between an anti-static bracelet and the earth ground of an outlet has a resistance on the order of a megaohm by my measurement recollection. It's meant to bleed off static electricity "slowly, " not to short your body to earth ground.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I fail to see the relevance. \$\endgroup\$ – J. Mini Jan 12 at 1:37
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    \$\begingroup\$ @J.Mini If you do not understand the significance of this then you should not be anywhere near any electric circuit, ever. \$\endgroup\$ – Elliot Alderson Jan 12 at 1:43
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    \$\begingroup\$ The relevance is that you could die if you make a mistake. \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany Jan 12 at 1:44
  • \$\begingroup\$ Draining accumulated charge slowly through a bleed resistor ensures you don't just dump all of that charge directly to ground through whatever you're working on (eg. the very thing you're trying to protect). Imagine the object you're working on has accumulated some non-negligible amount of static charge, and you then touch it with a wrist strap with no series resistor. It will discharge instantaneously through the object at a high current, possibly damaging it. With the series resistor this charge would be bled down slowly and safely. \$\endgroup\$ – Platytude Jan 12 at 1:46
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Platytude No, you have also missed the point. Read Spehro's comment. It's a safety issue. \$\endgroup\$ – Elliot Alderson Jan 12 at 2:13

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