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When I was looking through the datasheet of the LM358 op-amp, I have seen that they have given two columns in page-4 and page-5 with same parameter name "output current". The first column in page-4 has a set of source and sink values ans the column in page-5 has a set of source and sink values. So why there are two seperate columns for same parameter with different values. The test conditions are also same in the two columns except for the column in page-4 where the Ta value of 25°C is given and the second column does not have that value. Is there any other reason why there are two separate columns with different output current or else they are only for denoting the current range at different temperatures.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Note the words sink and source behind it and read current sourcing, current sinking or JYelton's answer in Sinking and sourcing current \$\endgroup\$ – Huisman 2 days ago
  • \$\begingroup\$ Hello sir, I already have knowledge on sourcing and sinking and I don't have any doubts in them. What I am asking is that there are two seperate columns in two pages with the same parameter name "output current", each those columns in each page has their own set of source and sink values. Column in page 4 has a set of source and sink values and the column in page 5 has a set of source and sink values. So my doubt is why there are two seperate columns with different output current value. \$\endgroup\$ – kailash kumaravel 2 days ago
  • \$\begingroup\$ It's not just the current rows (not columns) which are repeated, also Large signal voltage gain. The explanation is per Dino's answer: first values are for a particular temperature, second values are across the whole temperature range. \$\endgroup\$ – jonathanjo 2 days ago
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See Note 4. The first Output Current is specified at ambient temperature = 25°C. The second one is in the range 0-70°C (and, understandably, the numbers are smaller).

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