0
\$\begingroup\$

I am very new to electronics and drawing isn't my strength either, so please forgive the bad diagram. But I hope it makes sense.

I want to be able to control a motor using relays and be able to change the direction of the rotation. From what I know, the rotation can be reversed by changing the power to negative and positive terminals. As far as I could understand, I won't be able to do that with one relay. So I plan on using two relays. The diagram shows this (badly). Basically the dashed lines represent circuit for one directional control and the solid lines show circuit for opposite direction.

As I am sharing the battery for both relays, when either of the relays are in open state the cable for the other circuit that is connected from motor to the battery would cause a short. To overcome this issue I will use a diode on both cables that run from motor to battery terminals.

So I guess the questions are,

Does my plan seems reasonable? Is there a better way of doing what I want?

enter image description here

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Do you need three states, forward - off - reverse? \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Jan 19 at 0:15
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yeah, I do. Thanks for the reply. \$\endgroup\$ – SANM2009 Jan 19 at 0:22
3
\$\begingroup\$

I suggest:

schematic

simulate this circuit – Schematic created using CircuitLab

With both relays off or both on, both motor terminals are connected to the same voltage, so the motor doesn't run. Operate either relay to connect its end of the motor to the other voltage to make the motor run in the desired direction.

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

The best way is by using a H bridge , however if you would like to use only two relays, check the simple attached diagram : Relay one ON, Two OFF: IE Motor runs clockwise Relay one Off, Two ON: Motor will run anticlockwise Both are OFF: no spinning.enter image description hereenter image description here

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.