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Does an induction machine actually consume reactive power?

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    \$\begingroup\$ too many flaws in your claims. It would take a very long answer, a school book. \$\endgroup\$ – Marko Buršič Jan 23 at 11:43
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    \$\begingroup\$ so, these are five questions in one, where the first already is a bit broad, and the second requires one to go back and explain all the basics of AC current theory. So, no, this is far too broad as a question to be answered here. Please pick one specific (not "am I right?") question, and ask it. \$\endgroup\$ – Marcus Müller Jan 23 at 12:24
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Yes, an induction machine always consumes reactive power, both working as generator or as motor (more common case). Reactive power is necessary for the operation of any induction machine.

Source: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Induction_generator

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It is not quite correct to say that reactive power is consumed. Reactive power is the continuous transfer of energy back and forth between capacitive and inductive storage. The only energy that is consumed in the usual sense is due to relatively small losses dissipated as heat in resistance during energy transfer. The only capacitive storage elements are capacitors and wound-field synchronous machines.

That being said, it is true that induction motors require reactive current to function. The reactive component of the current creates the rotating magnetic field in the motor. The real component results in real component of the input electrical power that is converted to mechanical power.

Here are some related questions that may have useful answers:

How can we visualize active reactive and apparent power as areas in time domain?

How does a conventional generator produce only reactive power?

Why is power factor such a meaningful quantity?

Reactive power … consumption?

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