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I have a dickens of a time finding a datasheet for a spare relay that I want to reuse. Here are the images of it:

enter image description here

The text from the side there is:

HC1-AC240V LR42758 30111H AP311998 3A30VDC 10A 1/3HP 125,250VAC

The pins:

enter image description here

The other side showing "Aromat" (but I cannot tell if that is the manufacturer of the coil inside the relay, or the entire relay):

enter image description here

I've web-searched laboriously and came up short.

One datasheet looks close: https://www.alliedelec.com/m/d/2454bde37e51c885d9084c84a437bef1.pdf but I doubt that is the exact one because the breakout for the part number has many more dashes than "HC1-AC240V".

I speculate that the "LR" implies it is a Latching Relay but not sure. I get a lot of search results for "LR42758"

Is there a online search engine somewhere whereby I can put in this information and get back datasheets specifically for it? Or am I just going to have to chuck it and start with something new (they are not that expensive, just hate throw something useful away).

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2 Answers 2

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Aromat is Matsushita is Panasonic. That's an obsolete item, we were using them back in the early 90s. There are, however, compatible products out there. The LRxxx number is a file number for the safety approvals and won't give you any more information about that specific device (it would cover many different part numbers).

Here's a datasheet

That will give you the important life curves for various loads, and other data that's not obvious.

It's a simple SPDT power relay with 240VAC coil, nothing special, but well-made and reliable within it's stated lifetime for proper loads.

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You don't need a datasheet. All the information is provided on the relay.

It's pretty clear from the lower photo that it's not a latching relay.

enter image description here

Figure 1. Close-up of relay contacts.

  • The coil is 240 V AC.*
  • There is a single changeover contact. Figure 1 shows that the white wire is connected to the moving contact armature and is in the normally closed (NC) position.
  • When the coil is energised the armature will be pulled towards the coil and the common will contact the normally open (NO) contact.

You should be able to visually trace each of the contacts and the white wire to pins 2, 7 and 12. You should be able to measure the coil resistance on pins 13 and 14.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ +5 if that were possible: Fantastic info there. Thank you! I'll ponder through that and give it a test. If I could award both yours and Spehro Pefhany's response at electronics.stackexchange.com/a/477888/6570 as dual answers, I would. \$\endgroup\$
    – bgoodr
    Commented Jan 26, 2020 at 18:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ Coil resistance measured at DC conditions between pins 13 and 14: 13.56k. I applied an increasing AC voltage using a variable transformer between pins 13 and 14 and the contactor started rattling on at around 98VAC, and was solid-on at 100VAC. \$\endgroup\$
    – bgoodr
    Commented Jan 27, 2020 at 5:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ It did not, however, respond to DC voltages on pins 13 and 14 at all, even up to 30V which is the max my DC voltage supply could put out. But it is a AC relay so that is fine. \$\endgroup\$
    – bgoodr
    Commented Jan 27, 2020 at 5:49

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