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I have often heard heard voltage being described as a difference in charge between two points. If this is true, how is static electricity such high voltage even though it is a relatively small difference in charge?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ the narrower a container is, the higher the fluid level for the same amount of water \$\endgroup\$
    – DKNguyen
    Jan 26, 2020 at 21:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ The difference in charge between two points is related to the \$\mathscr{E}\$-field, which is measured in units of volts/meter, not volts. This is also known as Newtons/Coulomb. So what someone else said, or you read about, wasn't correctly picked up by your interpretation, I suspect, regardless of how often you heard/read it. \$\endgroup\$
    – jonk
    Jan 27, 2020 at 2:07

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Q = C·V

Hence, if C (capacitance) is small then, for a given charge (Q), the voltage will be high.

I have often heard heard voltage being described as a difference in charge between two points.

Maybe you need to check that definition.

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