0
\$\begingroup\$

Different ways to draw generic rectifier diodes.

What's the difference between these three different ways of symbolising a generic rectifier diode: solid, outline and outline with connection between anode and cathode?

\$\endgroup\$
6
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ All 3 are in common use. \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Smith Jan 27 '20 at 17:01
  • 3
    \$\begingroup\$ Amount of ink spent. Third one is more suited for hand drawing with templates since you can keep a straight line and then go back over it with a stencil later \$\endgroup\$ – DKNguyen Jan 27 '20 at 17:03
  • 12
    \$\begingroup\$ the third one means "reverse protection diode I almost forgot when drawing this schematic" :) \$\endgroup\$ – FrancoVS Jan 27 '20 at 17:06
  • 6
    \$\begingroup\$ To me, the third symbol implies you've just dropped the diode on top of a wire, without breaking the wire, so there is a short circuit between the diode terminals. \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Bennett Jan 27 '20 at 17:30
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ You already have the correct answers, based on norms, but let me add this. I seem to remember that some textbook authors take the liberty to associate the filled and empty ones with different models of a diode. So, for example, one symbol can be used to represent an ideal diode with zero threshold and infinite V/I slope and another can represent a diode with fixed nonzero threshold and slope corresponding to rd, or the exponential model based on Shockley equation. Not a norm, not a shared use, just good all babel of self-imposed conventions. Just to teach, at the beginning. \$\endgroup\$ – Sredni Vashtar Jan 27 '20 at 21:07
3
\$\begingroup\$

The filled symbol adheres to IEEE norms, the one with the line through it adheres to DIN/IEC norms, and the hollow one does not adhere to any norm.

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Do you happen to have any links to more information about the DIN and IEC standards? I'd really like to educate myself about the differences between those and the IEEE standards. \$\endgroup\$ – Elliot Alderson Jan 27 '20 at 19:11
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ pcad-libs.embedders.org/rules/ref_617.pdf Section 5.3 (page 79 / 05-6 in that document) Sorry, offical norms are paylinks. \$\endgroup\$ – Janka Jan 27 '20 at 19:33
4
\$\begingroup\$

All of those are standard diodes you can get details in enter image description here

the original image is from the site below : https://www.tubefr.com/types-de-diodes.html

\$\endgroup\$
0
3
\$\begingroup\$

IEEE Std 315, Graphic Symbols for Electrical and Electronics Diagrams, specifies this symbol for a "Semiconductor diode; semiconductor rectifier diode; metallic rectifier"

enter image description here

The letters in parentheses are not part of the symbol, and the enclosing circle is optional. So, at least in the U.S., the hollow symbols would be non-standard.

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

They all indicate the same thing. Just a stylistic difference.

\$\endgroup\$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.