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I'm trying to make a 25cc weed eater generator (for fun) and I'm thinking of using an alternator to take the rotary output from the engine and turn it into electricity. I need a way to take the 12-14V AC from the alternator's output and turn it into ~12V DC to charge a 12V battery and power an inverter. The alternator I have my eyes on is a 35A ~12V output, but it only has one wire for output. I'm thinking I need to use a bridge rectifier to take the AC into DC, but I'm not sure If I can hook the single wire AC to a bridge rectifier. Is there a way to wire it to a bridge rectifier properly, or is there a better way I can go about doing this?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The one you link to already has a bridge rectifier (and a regulator) built into the back, under that stamped cover. \$\endgroup\$
    – Phil G
    Jan 29, 2020 at 16:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ just because it is called an alternator, it does not mean that the output is AC ... the name comes from the technology used to generate the electric current \$\endgroup\$
    – jsotola
    Jan 29, 2020 at 16:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ @PhilG are you referring to the beige-ish part with the 2 terminals that has "IG" on the top? It doesn't look like something that would output 35 amps.. \$\endgroup\$
    – TWB503
    Jan 29, 2020 at 16:56
  • \$\begingroup\$ @jsotola ah, thanks. I read somewhere that it's AC, guess I was misinformed :) \$\endgroup\$
    – TWB503
    Jan 29, 2020 at 16:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ The output is the stud, the terminal is for a warning light that goes to the ignition - that also turns the alternator on when the key is turned, but the 1-wire types will turn themselves on without this (they sense the output from the stator to detect that it is running). The regulator is the finned aluminum part, the rectifier is a pair of horseshoe-shaped plates (covered in a grey epoxy coating) that run around the bearing boss where those three screws are. \$\endgroup\$
    – Phil G
    Jan 29, 2020 at 17:02

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A car alternator produces a DC output so you don’t need a bridge rectifier. The one you have linked is for a Chevy. Single wire is usually positive and metal chassis of alternator negative.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ oh, i didn't know.. how does the single wire work though, is it just positive and I have to get negative from elsewhere? (Sorry, I'm new to alternators) \$\endgroup\$
    – TWB503
    Jan 29, 2020 at 16:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ I amended my answer to give you that detail. \$\endgroup\$
    – Andy aka
    Jan 29, 2020 at 16:55

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