-1
\$\begingroup\$

Ok I’m am hoping someone can help me. THREE of my 4 door locks stopped working. Dealer quotes me $500 (parts, labor, tax) or $200 (parts, tax). Quote to myself to fix

FC-280ST-16200
KD603713

Internet searches are proving it difficult to get a match of the last five digits. of FC-280ST-XXXXX or if I do find a match I am unable to buy from the manufacturer who my guess designed specifically SUBARU. How important are these last five digits and how risky is it to install a part whose last digits are different?

I found a spec sheet for FFC-280ST and wonder is it ok to use those specs to aid in my search finding a similar replacement? Any DC motor experts out there who can help me locate a little DC motor which can replace my broken ones?

DC Maybe

\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ Did you try searching by make and model of the car instead? For example: "toyota camry door lock motor." Just a suggestion. \$\endgroup\$ – mkeith Feb 1 at 18:45
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Yes. No luck. Returns the entire part since the DC Motor is not sold alone. 2014 SUBARU FORESTER. I essentially extracted the motor from the part and will put back together once I find a replacement \$\endgroup\$ – KrazyKat Feb 1 at 18:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ If you are in the US I would be tempted to buy this part for 10 bucks and see if it works. amazon.com/Central-Actuator-FC-280PC-22125-Spindle-Locking/dp/… \$\endgroup\$ – mkeith Feb 1 at 19:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ They will all differ in winding details : lower "no load" speed corresponds with higher torque, less current use, lower stall current. So if you pick the 10000 rpm one it'll stress the wiring a bit less, have more torque, and the lock may operate a little slower. That would be my choice unless I still had one working one - then I'd measure it. Edit : funnily enough it's number is -16200, matching your photo. \$\endgroup\$ – Brian Drummond Feb 1 at 19:07
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ @KrazyKat I wouldn't think twice about replacing the motors. I'd just do it, with some personal testing. You have a fourth "working" door lock. So you can measure the current under load, etc. I'd do that, as well, to use in evaluating motors. They are cheap enough, so I'd just have fun with this. I had a motorized window on a car where the only "part" they could sell me was $200, which included a lot of stuff that was still working just fine -- an entire assembly. I just tore it down and replaced the one part that had "worn out" (it was plastic -- so I created a 3D printer part to replace it.) \$\endgroup\$ – jonk Feb 1 at 19:14
3
\$\begingroup\$

How important are these last five digits and how risky is it to install a part whose last digits are different?

The last 5 digits are important because they tell you the number of turns and diameter of wire on the armature, which determines the motor's power and torque. Too few turns will draw too much current, which will reduce the motor's lifespan and possibly burn it out and/or damage the control circuit. Too many turns and it won't have enough torque, possibly stalling and burning out.

I found a spec sheet for FFC-280ST and wonder is it ok to use those specs to aid in my search finding a similar replacement?

Yes. If you find a motor of the same size with similar no-load speed and stall current (at the same voltage) then it should do the job.

|improve this answer|||||
\$\endgroup\$
  • \$\begingroup\$ @ Bruce Abbott, this is my problem I can’t seem to find one :( \$\endgroup\$ – KrazyKat Feb 4 at 14:18

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.