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[![enter image description here][1]][1]I accidentally punctured just the very first (pouch?) layer on my MacBook lithium ion battery. A smell came out of it but the battery still works fine and holds charge. from what I've read, this is just the solvent being released from the battery and I haven't actually damaged the battery cell itself. But I can't find the answer to is this in danger of exploding? Thanks!

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    \$\begingroup\$ Yes. Pics or it didn't happen. You either damaged an outer layer of additional casing, which is unlikely if something with a smell was released or you created a hole that you simply can't see in the actual cell. If the latter is the case, it hasn't exploded yet. Charging the cell could cause it to "go off" if this is the case, and if allowed to deplete itself the cell will be less dangerous. Metal containers and a suitable storage locations are your friends while you figure it out. \$\endgroup\$
    – K H
    Feb 9, 2020 at 22:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ If you had a hot fire the size of a softball/basketball burning unattended and you wanted it to store it so as to expend its fuel without damaging anything else, this is the way you should store the battery. Note that aluminum melts at only 660\$^\circ\$C so only very thick aluminum containers are suitable. \$\endgroup\$
    – K H
    Feb 9, 2020 at 22:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ Prop up the battery and hold the camera still and think about angle of lighting to get a better picture. That one isn't good enough. \$\endgroup\$
    – K H
    Feb 9, 2020 at 22:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ Aiming at something at an equal depth from the lens will help you get the camera to focus on a thin object. It appears to have focused on the consumer label in the background. \$\endgroup\$
    – K H
    Feb 9, 2020 at 22:08
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    \$\begingroup\$ That is the smell of solvent of a compromised pack. You might argue it's residual from manufacture...but that's chancing it. \$\endgroup\$
    – DKNguyen
    Feb 9, 2020 at 22:36

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It's damaged. The solvent is part of the electrolyte in the battery.

Keep it outside in a vented firesafe area until you can dispose of it properly. The last time I punctured a lithium battery it ignited a blue flame that luckily extinguished itself while I was running to toss it outside which is where it stayed thereafter. But they have been known to explode into a fireball and burn things down when punctured.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ So even if I didn't damage the inside of the battery its still dangerous? I did not puncture the actual cell. It was just the coating on the outside of the battery \$\endgroup\$
    – hawkeyes17
    Feb 9, 2020 at 21:39
  • \$\begingroup\$ if you can smell it, sell it. \$\endgroup\$
    – Ariser
    Feb 9, 2020 at 21:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ @hawkeyes17 You described it as a solvent that smells which could only be the electrolyte normally INSIDE the cell. If it is, you did puncture the cell. I don't know how you could think you did not puncture the cell when liquid is leaking out of it. Where did you even read the it is okay? \$\endgroup\$
    – DKNguyen
    Feb 9, 2020 at 21:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ Theres no liquid coming out of it. \$\endgroup\$
    – hawkeyes17
    Feb 9, 2020 at 21:49
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    \$\begingroup\$ @hawkeyes17 You're contradicting yourself. You can smell it, which means something is coming out somewhere. \$\endgroup\$
    – DKNguyen
    Feb 9, 2020 at 21:50

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