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I have been planning on a homemade wind turbine, but I could not find any low rpm brushless dc motor and it's quite expensive.

So I wonder if I could modify a ceiling fan to generate electricity. I need guidance on making this project and I want to get a decent result.

I'm going to modify the rotor of the ceiling fan, basically put neodynium magnets around it.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I guess you have already seen this Youtube video? \$\endgroup\$
    – anrieff
    Feb 29, 2020 at 15:04
  • \$\begingroup\$ Better place to start: follow the links in this Q&A. electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/210207/… \$\endgroup\$ Feb 29, 2020 at 15:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ Use a car alternator. It's designed as a generator and has decent power. There are plenty of brushed motors in cars too that would be suitable - window wipers, window winders, engine fans, interior fans, ... \$\endgroup\$
    – Transistor
    Oct 29, 2021 at 19:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ how do you measure a result as "decent" \$\endgroup\$
    – Jasen
    Oct 30, 2021 at 3:47

2 Answers 2

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That seems like a lot of work and expense to make a low-wattage turbine. Further, ceiling fan motors are often the ‘shaded pole’ type, which are inexpensive and quiet but don’t lend themselves to being converted to alternators.

You might have more success converting a washing machine motor. Lots of links on the interwebs for that.

These hacks break down into the types. Washers with so-called ‘smart drive’ motors are exactly what you need. They already are coil-stators with permanent-magnet rotors. Basically they’re big brushless DC motors. Spin the thing and you get 3-phase AC.

Older washers use AC motors with a field winding. Provide a way to energize the field coils and you have an AC generator.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you very much sir \$\endgroup\$ Mar 1, 2020 at 0:18
  • \$\begingroup\$ But i cant get the smart drive motor here its hard to find one \$\endgroup\$ Mar 1, 2020 at 0:34
  • \$\begingroup\$ But is it gonna work if i used the ceiling fan as a generator \$\endgroup\$ Mar 1, 2020 at 0:35
  • \$\begingroup\$ It depends on the type of motor. I don’t know what you have so it’s difficult to say. \$\endgroup\$ Mar 1, 2020 at 2:47
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Yes, you could put neodymium magnets in the rotor of an induction motor to make a permanent-magnet synchronous generator. It is likely that people have done that and described their projects on the internet. You would need to machine the rotor to make spaces to insert magnets. You would need to find a suitable epoxy to hold the magnets in place.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you very much sir \$\endgroup\$ Mar 1, 2020 at 0:18

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