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I reacently modified an off-grid solar system, nothing fancy just included an automatic "turn on" switch for the Victron Phoenix 24/220 1200VA inverter. Then I connected the loads (2 computers, internet and phones) and it worked for about 2 seconds before shut down. This happened before when to many equipments was connected, we have printers, lights and other stuff that I manually disconnect to use the inverter, this usually was fixed by turned the inverter off and on again. I restarted it, and now it will show the blinking red led with no green led showing low battery voltage, it wasn't obvious untill I disconnected the solar panels and the voltage droped to 10V (24 voltage system) if I try to turn on the inverter. I know something went wrong, the only variable is that some phone guys were working yesterday and they changed the modem and a phone that I didn't disconnect, this because I thought it would not be a problem.

The inverter for itself will show blinking red light and the nothing, if I turn on the solar panels the battery voltage will somehow "stabilize" and allow the inverter to acctualy run, however 50% of the times it will fail and will show again the blinking red light. If I succeed and the inverter starts, it will shut down if I connect a load bigger than 200W, after that it will also show the blinking red led again.

According to Victron, blinking red lights and no green light is indication of low batery voltage, however the inverter itself is the cause of the low battery voltage, as soon as I disconnect tehe inverter the battery voltage will recover to 25 volts.

I am an electrician and not an electronic thecnician however I can perform replacements and identification of components, what should I be looking at in the inside of the inverter to fix it up?

Thank you for your help.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Battery is bad, a logical explanation. Also, the battery ions can't move as fast as they should, next explanation is that current is too high. \$\endgroup\$ – Marko Buršič Mar 4 at 17:34
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    \$\begingroup\$ How many nad what type of batteries are you using? \$\endgroup\$ – ambitiose_sed_ineptum Mar 4 at 17:35
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    \$\begingroup\$ 10V battery voltage on a 24V system could very well mean your batteries are beyond rescue. Might have been caused by completely draining the batteries and not immediately recharging them. \$\endgroup\$ – StarCat Mar 4 at 17:35
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    \$\begingroup\$ Bad battery or bad battery connection. Hopefully the latter. Check voltages on teh battery itself when you start the inverter, and repeat for the voltage on the inverter terminals. \$\endgroup\$ – Brian Drummond Mar 4 at 17:38
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    \$\begingroup\$ Do you have a multimeter to measure the input no load current and the input current at the largest load you can sustain? If the inverter is pulling the battery that low, suspect causes are a damaged battery(frozen when empty or bent plates or electrolyte problems), too small of a battery or that the inverter is drawing more current than it should. You may have underestimated input power which is probably up to 125% of your output power. You haven't mentioned the total size of your battery bank or your actual total intended load. What size wires connect the battery to inverter? \$\endgroup\$ – K H Mar 4 at 20:40
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Check the battery. If it's a lead acid battery, then cells can suddenly fail, presenting a very high resistance. With no load, it may appear normal, but adding any load on the battery will make the voltage drop instantly.

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It sounds to me that it is as simple as the current being delivered to the inverter is to low for the inverters demand. This could mean one of several things. The batteries need to be larger (i.e. more amperage) the wire is too small and incapable of carrying enough amperage or there is a junction that is a high resistance feed which is not capable of carrying or passing enough current. There are more similar scenarios that exhibit the same properties and carry the same problems.

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    \$\begingroup\$ This is not a valid comunity wiki entrence. \$\endgroup\$ – winny Mar 5 at 15:13

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