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The figure below shows a BLDC motor (TSDZ2 Ebike Motor). It has 18 stator windings (3 phase -> 3 pole pairs per phase) and 16 poles on the rotor. What are possible reasons for this design? Why is a lower pole count on the rotor beneficial?

Is my assumption correct that the ratio between electrical and mechanical revolutions is given by the rotor pole count? In this case there would be 8 electrical cycles per mechanical revolution.

TSDZ2 BLCD Motor

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Quite a good explanation here electronics.stackexchange.com/questions/483177/… \$\endgroup\$ – user_1818839 Mar 8 '20 at 13:11
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks, i did not know that the same number of stator slots and rotor poles does not work. But it makes totally sense as you could end up in a configuration where you are not able to turn the rotor as all the magnets are aligned. \$\endgroup\$ – benno Mar 8 '20 at 15:34
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The unequal numbers are chosen to minimize ripple. The rotating field is generated in the stator, hence mechanical rotation depends on the stator

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The winding diagram table in the answer suggested by Brian states exactly the opposite. \$\endgroup\$ – benno Mar 8 '20 at 15:46

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