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Given a lamination stack that is exposed to a transient magnetic field, how can the potential difference between the individual laminations be determined? is there a rough rule of thumb that can be used?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Please explain more by what you mean by "Machine Laminations". Is this layers of a FR4 circuit board? \$\endgroup\$ – Aaron Mar 10 '20 at 20:23
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Aaron: Use of the tag [electric-machine] and the context of the question indicates that the question is about the steel laminations used for the magnetic cores of electric machines. \$\endgroup\$ – Charles Cowie Mar 11 '20 at 13:51
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The voltage producing eddy-currents in electric machinery and transformer laminations does not seem to be discussed in electric machinery and transformer texts. Where the lamination insulation is discussed, the focus seems to be on the mechanical properties of the material and maintaining material integrity. The implication seems to be that the voltage is very low and that minimal insulation property is required, but maintaining mechanical integrity is essential. Oxidation produced by annealing is sufficient in terms of insulation voltage, but other materials are used for their thermal and mechanical durability.

The procedure for determining the voltage across the insulation seems to be to apply Maxwell's equations to the core prior to dividing it into slices by construction using laminations.

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