0
\$\begingroup\$

I have a number of different switches, all with solder lugs more or less similar to this:

Solder Lug

I have soldered some stranded wire to it, using a method I found in a video where the stranded wire is stripped, the exposed strands twisted and soldered together, then put through the hole in the lug and soldered to the lug. The electrical connection works great, but I worry about the mechanical stress on the connection. Here is a picture of the soldering job itself:

my actual wiring

I can easily bend the wire 90 degrees from the contact point if I wanted to, which doesn't give me much confidence in the mechanical strength of the connection. Is this a job that shrink wrap/electrical tape could fix? Or should I be soldering this differently?

\$\endgroup\$
3
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ That is a panel mount switch. Once you have put it in an enclosure, there are many ways to restrain the wires. If you are using it outside of an enclosure, I would cable-tie the two wires together near the switch, then apply large heat shrink over the switch. \$\endgroup\$
    – Mattman944
    Mar 23 '20 at 15:29
  • \$\begingroup\$ You can use something like RTV. But that makes repairs or replacements more difficult. \$\endgroup\$
    – SteveSh
    Mar 23 '20 at 15:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ Liquid electrical tape. \$\endgroup\$
    – DKNguyen
    Mar 23 '20 at 22:26
6
\$\begingroup\$

You can use Heat-shrink tubing to reinforce the connection.

\$\endgroup\$
2
\$\begingroup\$

It is good engineering practise not to use an electrical connection to serve as mechanical connection as well.

In my opinion, heat shrink does not provide a solid mechanical connection.
It does provide isolation when soldered to the switch and also provides a chance the cable will still be isolated when the solder connection breaks (i.e. when the cable comes loose with the heatshrink is still on the cable covering the bare copper wire(s)).

I think a better solution is to use hot glue between the lugs of the connector up to the outer sheath/jacket of both cables.

Another solution is a kind of (DIY made) strain release that is fixed to the switch or to the panel which holds the switch, and fixates the cable (on its outer sheath/jacket).

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ Heatshrink provides strain relief and strain relief is required in many industries when making cable connections \$\endgroup\$
    – Voltage Spike
    Jun 4 '20 at 5:26

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.