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currently I'm wiring my converted RV. I've a 12V system and want to connect 12V LED lights. I don't want to use RV or rocker switches. I bought standard house light switches. After a lot of research I figured out that I can use them in my 12V system. All of my LED Lights will consume not more than 2,4 amp, one of the switches is designed for 15 amp.

Ok here my question. Is it possible to share the positive wire from the breaker box with both light switches and go back to the breaker box with a shared negative wire?

I want to use T wire connectors or something similar. The reason is because the DC breaker box (Blue Sea Fuse Block) has only one free slot for connecting. The alternative is to connect two wires on one screw of the breaker box. But I think this will be same result.

What do you think? Will this work or is there a better alternative?

Wiring diagram

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  • \$\begingroup\$ For those who don't know; can you clarify what you mean by "RV" \$\endgroup\$ – Jakob Halskov Mar 25 '20 at 8:51
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    \$\begingroup\$ @Jakob Recreational Vehicle or motor home. \$\endgroup\$ – Passerby Mar 25 '20 at 17:35
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Is it possible to share the positive wire from the breaker box with both light switches and go back to the breaker box with a shared negative wire?

Yes you can do that, as long as cabling is thick enough to handle currents from all of your lights.

Will this work or is there a better alternative?

Circuit looks perfectly fine.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you for the quick answer. I think I'm good with my 14 awg stranded wire for all DC connections. \$\endgroup\$ – cYbton Mar 25 '20 at 13:04
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Fundamentally no different than running multiple wires in parallel. As mentioned you need to size the wire for the combined load, but 16 or 18 gauge will be fine for the 4 Amps 12v here.

The switch may be an issue. Household 120v switches are not intended to be used with DC voltage. They depend on the AC sine wave to ensure little arcing and keeping the contacts clean. It's good that your intended load is much smaller than the maximum load on one of these switches (15 to 20 amps 120v AC) but they may not last as long as a 12v DC switch. You could add a relay to bring down the current even more on the light switch, so it will last longer.

Make sure you use a fuse to be safe.

Also for future reference, typically a schematic or wiring diagram should be positive on top and ground on bottom. Your diagram is upside down and that makes it hard to read.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Thank you for the quick answer. I have a 14 awg stranded wire for all dc connections. Ok good to know I will try it. And the next time the diagram will be better ;) \$\endgroup\$ – cYbton Mar 25 '20 at 13:03
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    \$\begingroup\$ @cYbton to be clear, 14 awg is fine--that's larger than the 16 or 18 gauge passerby recommended. \$\endgroup\$ – Hearth Mar 25 '20 at 13:48

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