0
\$\begingroup\$

Yes, I am talking about a constant current source not a voltage source. Would the 1 Amp go to my body?

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ if the constant current source is able to ramp up the voltage until 1 A flows through you, then yes \$\endgroup\$
    – jsotola
    Mar 25 '20 at 4:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ This also gives relevant information: electronics.stackexchange.com/q/487891/152903 \$\endgroup\$
    – Solar Mike
    Mar 25 '20 at 8:21
4
\$\begingroup\$

If you touch a 1 amp constant current source with a maximum voltage of 5v, then the very large impedance of your body will max out the voltage of the source, resulting in 5v and essentially no current flow.

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • \$\begingroup\$ so basically a 5 volts 1 Amp is safe? \$\endgroup\$
    – Rocket
    Mar 25 '20 at 4:22
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ @Rocket I would touch a 1A current source capable of outputting a maximum of 5V before I would poke my finger with a pointy wodden toothpick. \$\endgroup\$
    – DKNguyen
    Mar 25 '20 at 4:29
2
\$\begingroup\$

Under these conditions (extremely high load resistance), your 1 A constant current source will behave as a 5 V constant voltage source.

\$\endgroup\$
1
\$\begingroup\$

The maximum power it can output is \$5W\$.
Human body's resistance varies between \$1k\$ to \$100k\$;so the \$1A\$ current source fails doing it's job and pumps only \$50 \mu A\$ to \$5 mA\$ through your body.

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

At low frequencies (DC) nothing would happen as the compliance of the source is too low and the body impedance is too high,thus very little current would flow. But, if this is RF you could get a nasty burn or sever electrical shock.

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • 1
    \$\begingroup\$ Welcome to EE.SE. It is unlikely that the OP (original poster) will understand what 'RF' stands for. Hit the edit link below your question ... \$\endgroup\$
    – Transistor
    Mar 25 '20 at 7:37

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.