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I was wondering if anybody was using PLL (Phase Locked Loop) in DIY hobby project? If yes what was the application? Did you made it from discrete components (as opposed from one placed in uController or FPGA) ?

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closed as not constructive by Kortuk Aug 15 '12 at 13:10

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  • \$\begingroup\$ since I do not have enough reputation points to create new tag, could somebody pls mark the question with "PLL" tag. thx. \$\endgroup\$ – mazurnification Oct 6 '10 at 8:31
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I used a PLL made of a Signetics NE565 PLL chip plus a few discrete components in a walkie-talkie. It was used for FM demodulation at 300 kHz.

From Google, it looks like Signetics has been bought by NXP; I can't find a product page for the chip.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ You can find a datasheet for a compatible LM565 at National's site. Note that it's marked obsolete. \$\endgroup\$ – stevenvh Jan 30 '11 at 17:05
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I use the onboard PLL on dsPIC processors. Normally designed to operate at 40 MHz output (80 MHz internally) it will go up to 65 MHz with no sign of problems. This was on a breadboard, but the only part connected to the breadboard was the chip's pin, connected to a scope probe. The PLL is only designed for internal use by the chip as the CPU clock. But it can be used to synthesise frequencies.

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I use the on-chip PLL’s in Microchip PIC parts to increase the clock frequency. They work fine for me. The only problem I've had with them is when I’ve set them up incorrectly. This causes you to get a clock frequency different from what you are expecting. I’ve found that outputting the clock to an I/O pin then taking a mesasurement with an oscilloscope can easily detect this issue.

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I've also only used PLL's in clock systems for AVR (tiny26) and FPGA (NIOS) applications.

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Many years ago I used the Signetics NE565 PLL chip to build a 1 MHz frequency standard phase-locked to the BBC 200 kHz long wave transmission.

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