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Very hard information to find since Google always falls down in how many devices can be connected simultaneously to a single one network.

Is there a limit to how many different WiFi networks can work properly in the same place?

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    \$\begingroup\$ What do you mean by work? On each frequency band in a single location, if two devices try to talk concurrently they'll most likely interfere. There can be an unlimited number of idle devices not transmitting however. \$\endgroup\$ Mar 29 '20 at 21:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ "Properly" can mean many things. For instance, something can still work properly, but not very well. \$\endgroup\$
    – DKNguyen
    Mar 29 '20 at 21:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ Let's say I create X separate networks and X different IoT devices connect 1 to 1 to one network each and send a few data \$\endgroup\$
    – Cinn
    Mar 29 '20 at 21:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ I believe there are sixteen wifi channels, but i'm not sure of that. \$\endgroup\$
    – Hearth
    Mar 29 '20 at 22:24
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You had two parts in the question:

  1. How many devices can be connected simultaneously to a single one network? The limit is when the traffic reaches the saturation level of the channels. It depends on how frequently and how much data the WiFi clients use to communicate.

  2. Is there a limit to how many different WiFi networks can work properly in the same place? Yes, it can happen fast. Ideally, each Wifi access point should choose a different non-overlapping channel. Ideally, channels 1, 6 or 11 on 2.4GHz. The 5GHz space has more alternatives and bandwidth, thus it can better tolerate the same amount of access points than 2.4GHz in the same physical space.

Below is the channel utilization my Ubiquity access point sees in a highly-populated area.

below is the channel utilization my Ubiquity access point sees in a highly-populated area

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    \$\begingroup\$ Yeah, people should stop using 2.4G. \$\endgroup\$ Mar 30 '20 at 2:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ Note that the number of independent channels depends on the bandwidth of the channels which varies with the type/speed of WiFi. It also depends on the region. See en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_WLAN_channels for details. \$\endgroup\$
    – jcaron
    Mar 30 '20 at 7:25

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