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While performing rectification task in lab. We use 0V and 12V as negative and positive terminal of input supply in central tap full wave rectifier and -6V and 6V as negative and positive terminal of input supply in bridge rectifier. We are told that we have to use 0V(ground) in central tap rectifier but there is no need of ground in bridge rectifier. Please tell me what is the reason behind it and why ground is not needed in bridge rectifier?

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    \$\begingroup\$ please add a schematic to your post. There's no point answering unless we can both see what we are referring to. Use the schematic editor provided on this board, it's the diode/resistor/capacitor button on the toolbar when you edit your post. \$\endgroup\$
    – Neil_UK
    Apr 5, 2020 at 4:33
  • \$\begingroup\$ I am new to this site. Please explain a little bit how to improve the question and to add schematic. \$\endgroup\$
    – Manu
    Apr 5, 2020 at 4:38
  • \$\begingroup\$ Has cheche answered your question? Would you like me to put a starter schematic on your post? \$\endgroup\$
    – Neil_UK
    Apr 5, 2020 at 4:52

2 Answers 2

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0V is only a reference or common point and need not be connected to ground.

The full-wave bridge rectifier circuit has evolved from the 'full-wave rectifier with centre-tapped transformer' circuit, as shown below.

Capacitors have not been shown.

  1. Full wave rectifier circuit giving +V output with reference to the centre tap.

enter image description here

  1. Full wave rectifier circuit giving -V output with reference to the centre tap.

enter image description here

  1. Combination of 1 & 2 is the full wave bridge rectifier circuit giving +V & -V outputs with reference to the centre tap and 0V & +2V ignoring the centre tap.

enter image description here

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  • \$\begingroup\$ The diagram really helped a lot. Please give same schematic for full wave bridge rectifier. It will help a lot. \$\endgroup\$
    – Manu
    Apr 5, 2020 at 8:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ Hi Manu, the full wave bridge rectifier circuit is the one shown in 3! \$\endgroup\$
    – vu2nan
    Apr 5, 2020 at 8:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ Sorry, in books it is drawn in other way, so I made mistake. Yes, now I completely understood. Very awesome explanation! \$\endgroup\$
    – Manu
    Apr 5, 2020 at 8:31
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I just did this lab practice a few weeks ago, I think that you are asking about the circuit on this schematic:

enter image description here

A full wave rectifier based on center tap consists of two diodes in it as well as a center tapped transformer along with that a resistive load is connected across it.

The way it works is as follows:

The voltage provided by the AC Voltage source is driving the left inductor on the schematic, as it is magnetically coupled to the coil on the right the voltage across of the right coil is proportional to voltage across coil one time the transformer winding ratio, so if you have a ratio of lets say 2:1 the voltage across the second coil would be half the voltage across the first.

Please tell me what is the reason behind it and why ground is not needed in bridge rectifier?

Ground is not needed because lets say the inductor on the right has a voltage drop of 10V. So you can see this in two different ways. the first is that one side of the coil is at 0V and the other at 10V, the other way is that one side is at 5V and the other at -5V.

As the center tapping from the transformer is placed right in the middle we can tell that the voltage on the center tap would be half the voltage drop across the inductor, so if one side is at -5V and the other at 5V the center tap is at 0V potential.

Keep in mind that this is a virtual ground relative to the coil voltage, because as you said it is not strictly at ground potential, but it works as ground for the load you are driving on the right side of the circuit.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Awesome explanation. \$\endgroup\$
    – Manu
    Apr 5, 2020 at 6:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ Please suggest me a book in which concept of grounding in circuit is clearly explained. \$\endgroup\$
    – Manu
    Apr 5, 2020 at 6:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ I don't know one, I think of ground as the reference you are using to measure voltage in your circuit, I couldn't explain what ground is in a comment, maybe asking a separate question? \$\endgroup\$ Apr 5, 2020 at 8:14

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