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If i have a high current (12 amps) passing through my route is it ok to put via on it or to duplicate the route (150 mil on top and 150 mil on bottom)?

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Yes, if you have 150mil on top and bottom with both carrying half of the current, then each would get ~6A (or you could consider that both are 300 mil). This would give you a ~10C rise, if that is acceptable then use that. (Remember that it is resistance and temperature rise that determine trace size)

Also Make you do a current/resistance drop on the vias that you use, as they will contribute to loss and heating. (Saturn PCB makes a great calculator for this) Make sure vias are paralleled for the current they carry.

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Source: https://www.pcbcart.com/article/content/copper-trace-and-capacity-relationship.html

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Also keep in mind that the current is not going to share equally between the two traces. While not exactly the same as what you have, when using multiple pins to increase current carrying capacity, we add 25% & round up to get the number of pins needed. For instance,if we have to pass 2 amps through a connector and each pin is rated at 0.5 A (derated), then the number of pins we would use is 1.25*(2.0/0.5) = 5 pins. You probably want to use a similar derating factor here. \$\endgroup\$ – SteveSh Apr 13 '20 at 22:27
  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, the vias add resistance, depends on size and number. It also depends on which side you pull the current from (source on topside, load on topside vs source on topside, load on bottom) \$\endgroup\$ – Voltage Spike Apr 14 '20 at 4:02
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It's better to put 3 or 4 vias for such current and use larger vias or even THT size holes.

It's also better to make the trace as large as possible, if you have spare space, than stick with minimum values given by the calculation. It also depends on copper thickness. Doubling the copper thickness is like doubling the trace width, as high current is concerned.

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