0
\$\begingroup\$

I don't understand what this part is from my keyboard PCB design. Someone else worked on the design and I can't figure out what it is.Please help! enter image description here

Here's another image including other parts of the design. enter image description here

\$\endgroup\$
5
  • 2
    \$\begingroup\$ It's a connector. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka Apr 13 '20 at 14:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ Did this person not provide you an actual schematic loadable in an EDA package, or a BOM? Those would be big red flags... \$\endgroup\$ – Ron Beyer Apr 13 '20 at 14:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ That looks like it came from Altium; it may be a 'smart' PDF. Try right clicking on the component. \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Smith Apr 13 '20 at 14:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ Hello, thanks for replying. I am new here, sorry for taking long to respond. I updated my post with another image. So, you think it's a connector? \$\endgroup\$ – Jonathan Daniels Apr 13 '20 at 15:08
  • \$\begingroup\$ Hi @JonathanDaniels welcome to EE sx, you may have to clarify your question a littlle bit, there can be many things you don't understand about the schematic, lets say whether it is a connector or some confusion with the wiring, also you can barely see the text in the second picture. by having a non ambiguous question and detailed info you increase your chances of getting the response you want \$\endgroup\$ – diegogmx Apr 13 '20 at 16:57
0
\$\begingroup\$

It's a 6 pin connector. From the text below it, it's for connecting a programming cable - presumably this is some kind of custom keyboard where you can change the firmware.

Lacking any other information, I'd assume it is something like a pin header.

From the wikipedia page:

w

It might not be a pin header, though. There are all kinds of connectors out there. If you don't have the PCB layout or a picture or drawing of the finished board, then you're kind of stuck.

\$\endgroup\$
0
0
\$\begingroup\$

It is a 6-pin connector for the programmer. Think of P for 'plug' or 'pin'.

enter image description here

Figure 1. A 6-pin header connector.

Tip: Crop your photos.

\$\endgroup\$
1
  • \$\begingroup\$ Hello, thanks for replying. I am new here, sorry for taking long to respond. I updated my post with another image. So, you think it's a connector? \$\endgroup\$ – Jonathan Daniels Apr 13 '20 at 15:08
0
\$\begingroup\$

It is a connector, looking at the pinout most likely a programming connector. The actual connector depends on the footprint of P1.

Most programming connectors use set of header pins, either male or female.
Male is most likely.

As we already have a male and female, I'll add another type: a shrouded connector: enter image description here

\$\endgroup\$
0
\$\begingroup\$

It is a connector, but it doesn't have to be there. It depends on whether you plan to use it and what kind of connector you plan on connecting to it.
You can simply leave 6 through-hole contacts on the board.
These contacts are used if you want to do some in-circuit programming.

\$\endgroup\$
0
0
\$\begingroup\$

By convention, a "P" designation on a schematic or wiring diagram indicates a plug. A plug is by IEEE/ANSII conventions the movable part of a connection, or the more movable part. The fixed/less movable part is designated by a "J", for jack.

So if you have a board that going to plug into a motherboard, the connector on the board is designed as P-xxx, and the connector on the motherboard is designated as J-yyy, where xxx and yyy are numbers.

Similarly, if you have a cable that plugs into a chassis or box (like an Ethernet cable plugging into your PC), the connector on the cable is a plug (P), while the connector on the PC is a jack (Jack).

\$\endgroup\$
2
  • \$\begingroup\$ I think the P/J distinction you mention is often ignored. I sometimes use P for the male connector and J for female. \$\endgroup\$ – Peter Bennett Apr 13 '20 at 17:40
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Peter - I did too, before someone called me out on it <wink> .Per the standard, you can have a female or male plug. Likewise, a male or female jack. Obviously, some industries are more anal about that distinction than others. \$\endgroup\$ – SteveSh Apr 13 '20 at 17:46

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.