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In the past few years several countries stopped producing 100W incandescent lamps, and in a few years they may disappear to be succeeded by fluorescent lamps. I really don't like the flicker and the color most common fluorescent lamps produce.

Are there any other kinds of lamps that do not flicker and produce about the same warm light as incandescent lamps (that might not be banned from production in the nearest future)?

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LEDs that are powered from DC or even semi-filtered AC can provide a warm color without noticeable (or any) flicker. LED-based lighting will only become more available and more affordable in the future, as their efficiency makes them highly attractive for illumination applications.

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LED lights are improving and are pretty good. I don't know that there are any options beyond incandescent, florescent, and LED.

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    \$\begingroup\$ I don't know that there are any options beyond incandescent, fluorescent, and LED. Halogen, Metal halide, Sulfur, High pressure sodium, Low pressure sodium, and Induction. ~en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_light \$\endgroup\$ – Anonymous Penguin Aug 18 '13 at 19:05
  • \$\begingroup\$ Wow, lol. Except for halogen, what else would be appropriate for indoor lighting? \$\endgroup\$ – Tony Ennis Aug 18 '13 at 19:54
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    \$\begingroup\$ I think all of them. Some are more like the ones in football stadiums that have to warm up I think, but they can be used for gyms and huge rooms inside. \$\endgroup\$ – Anonymous Penguin Aug 19 '13 at 0:04
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LED lights do not flicker. In the past, this has been very difficult to control because you basically got whatever color your particular bulb produced. Typically this was a Warm White (about 3000K) if you had an incandescent bulb, and a Cool White (around 5000K) if you had a fluorescent bulb. Because the LED is an intelligent, solid-state technology, we are able to produce LEDs that not only produce Warm White and Cool White, but are able to produce up to 16 million different colors, each a different temperature.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Your answer is phrased a bit like marketing text :) Also it's more than 16777216 colors if you use more than 256 levels of brightness for each of an RGB diode colors. \$\endgroup\$ – user1306322 Jul 9 '14 at 23:49
  • \$\begingroup\$ @tForceled , EE.SE is not a place for doing marketing pitches. Fair warning. \$\endgroup\$ – Nick Alexeev Jul 10 '14 at 0:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ Looks plagiarized from a quick Google of some of the text \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Laplante Jul 10 '14 at 3:35

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