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I need to reproduce a high density circuit pattern on something that can withstand temperatures around the 300 °C mark in order withstand molten plastic flowing through channels on its surface without de-laminating the tracks (the other side of the board would be ambient temperatures). Was reading something about single sided circuits directly on glass but I also would like to be able to include vias.

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    \$\begingroup\$ interesting question ... why does molten plastic have to contact the PCB? \$\endgroup\$
    – jsotola
    Apr 21, 2020 at 4:51
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    \$\begingroup\$ How do you intend to solder the PCB since that's above softening point of most all common electronic solders? \$\endgroup\$ Apr 21, 2020 at 4:57
  • \$\begingroup\$ The application is a drop on demand print head for PLA plastic. The only components on the hot side are resistors (used to heat the plastic further to the point of vaporisation very briefly) which I plan on using drops of some type of carbon slurry bonded directly to the copper instead of discrete components. Everything else will be thermally managed with heat sinks and spacing. \$\endgroup\$
    – norlesh
    Apr 21, 2020 at 5:06
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    \$\begingroup\$ Double sided ceramic PCBs might be a thing to look into. Don't have any experience using these though - there are claims of working up to 850 °C. \$\endgroup\$
    – Arsenal
    Apr 21, 2020 at 6:55
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    \$\begingroup\$ Thermal-transfer printheads use a ceramic base for the 300 dpi impulse heaters. \$\endgroup\$
    – Transistor
    Apr 21, 2020 at 7:04

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Just so nobody is left wondering about the answer in the future thanks to suggestions in the comments section I have found that ceramic PCB technology exceeds my requirements.

Anyone interested in the topic should take a look at the paper Developing 300°C Ceramic Circuit Boards, Randy A. Normann, Perma Works LLC, 2015, which gives a report on the development of a circuit designed and built to monitor geothermal wells while being immersed in temperatures exceeding 300 °C and tested up to 550° C without failure (my application only requires a single surface to be in contact with the heat which seams trivial now in comparison).

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