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I'm looking to build my own power button for my computer.

Most motherboards have a pair of PWR_SW pins that your case power button typically attaches to via two female pin connector wires (I don't know the correct term). This is the part I plan on replacing. Attached to some button like this for example: https://www.adafruit.com/product/558

I'm also aware you can short the two pins by touching them both at once with a screwdriver and most motherboards will just turn on– is this basically what a switch / button does? If I attach two wires to the button above and press the button– I'm guessing that essentially does what the screwdriver does and completes the circuit– turning the computer on?

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    \$\begingroup\$ please bare with me means take off clothes .... the word you want is bear \$\endgroup\$ – jsotola May 4 '20 at 3:46
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    \$\begingroup\$ a switch touches two wires together internally \$\endgroup\$ – jsotola May 4 '20 at 3:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ your question appears to be about how a switch functions .... that makes all the references to the PC kind of irrelevant \$\endgroup\$ – jsotola May 4 '20 at 3:51
  • \$\begingroup\$ this may help ... duckduckgo.com/?q=knife+switch&ia=images&iax=images \$\endgroup\$ – jsotola May 4 '20 at 3:55
  • \$\begingroup\$ There are some (leaked) motherboard schematics online. I recommend looking into those to seeing how a power button activates everything else in the circuit board (except for standby power of course) \$\endgroup\$ – user103380 May 4 '20 at 4:39
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Yes, a switch contains conductive parts that contact or separate according to how the switch is designed and operated.

The PC power switch creates a conductive metal path between the wires while while it is pressed.

If you can duplicate that sort of thing you can make a power switch for your PC.

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