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My problem is that my work computer locks up if there is no activity for only a few minutes. One simple solution is to buy a wireless mouse (or even a wired mouse) that automatically sends a small nudge signal the PC every 30s if the mouse has not been moved for that much time. However, I can't find mouse with such capability built in. I don't know if I can reverse engineer my mouse and reprogram it to do this.

Please let me know if a mouse of this nature (not an expensive USB dongle) exists with this function. And, if it is possible to reverse engineer the code and reprogram the mouse. I have an ET X-08 gaming mouse.

Thanks.

EDIT: I should have used the term "locked" instead of "locks up". Basically the computer goes back to the log-in screen and requires me the enter the very long password again.

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    \$\begingroup\$ If it is literally at risk freezing every few minutes, that seems like a severe enough problem to get the company to fix or replace your PC. Does it still lock up even if your mouse is unplugged for a few minutes? No matter what is running on the PC? Or only when some application is running? Or is it the screensaver kicking in? In all cases that's your company's job to fix, not you spending dozens or hundreds of hours reverse engineering a stop gap. \$\endgroup\$ – DKNguyen May 6 at 13:38
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    \$\begingroup\$ @DKNguyen to me it sounds like locking up means the OS goes to the lock screen, OP can't change this timing due to company policy and wants to circumvent it with custom hardware. \$\endgroup\$ – Bart van Heukelom May 6 at 14:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ @BartvanHeukelom So? The company isn't paying him to to restart PC and redo work already done several times an hour. Policy or not, I find it hard to believe they would be willing to tolerate such a situation without trying to fix it on their end. Unless this is lockup intentional and happens to everyone, but OP has not made that clear either so I'm going to assume the much more likely scenario of a bug to be repaired, \$\endgroup\$ – DKNguyen May 6 at 14:10
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    \$\begingroup\$ @DKNguyen I think you're misinterpreting both me and the OP here (though only OP can confirm the latter). Like I said, I think the PC goes into a session lock, simply requiring authentication to continue. Nobody is talking about restarting, losing work, etc. I may be wrong about this, but you must interpret the things I said in that context. And regarding policy, I only meant that OP probably can't change this setting due to technical policies. I make no assumptions about general company policy, and no judgement of whether or not circumventing any such policy is right or wrong here. \$\endgroup\$ – Bart van Heukelom May 6 at 14:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ @DKNguyen: The OP is using the phrase "locks up" to mean that the normal Windows desktop lock taks effect. You just enter your password and get back to work - no recovery of lost work or anything needed. OP is spending too much time away from the computer, and doesn't want to reenter the password. \$\endgroup\$ – JRE May 6 at 14:29
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That's madness. If you're using Windows then try this:

set wsc = CreateObject("WScript.Shell")
Do
    WScript.Sleep(5*60*1000)    'Every 5 minutes ...
    wsc.SendKeys("{F13}")       '... press the F13 key.
Loop

Save it in nosleep.vbs on your Desktop and run it when required. F13 is chosen so that it doesn't interfere with anything else.

To check if it's running:

  • Open Task Manager (Ctrl-Shift-Esc) and go to Details tab.
  • If a VBScript or JScript is running, the process wscript.exe or cscript.exe would appear in the list. -
  • Right-click on the column header and enable "Command Line". This should tell you which script file is being executed.
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  • \$\begingroup\$ How do I know that a script of this name is running in the background? \$\endgroup\$ – Quantum0xE7 May 6 at 12:46
  • \$\begingroup\$ See the update. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor May 6 at 13:30
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Seems the type of device / program your looking for is called a "mouse jiggler", intended to shift the cursor some small amount in known time steps,

From a quick glace some only move the mouse about one pixel to prevent how much it effects the end user, as there is no easy way for that mouse to know to move.

As for modifying an actual mouse, they are very tolerant to most external distractions so you would likely have the most luck with a small bodge circuit inside. Most wireless mice dim their LED a few seconds after motion or clicking has stopped. When it dims you have something that times out 30 seconds, then close say the middle mouse button contacts with a mosfet, the mouse lights up, the circuit waits another 30 seconds and so on and so on.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Or for extra fun, add in a tiny cheap vibration motor (as used in phones). \$\endgroup\$ – Bart van Heukelom May 6 at 14:09
  • \$\begingroup\$ I have used this solution many years ago when debugging an ultrasound device running Windows 2000 that required periodic input during a long test sequence. I see no reason why it would not work on a modern computer. \$\endgroup\$ – user1850479 May 6 at 15:19
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You should first try the script proposed by Transistor. However if you do not have permissions to change screensaver settings, perhaps you can't execute the script either.

Simplest solution I can think about would be a microcontroller development module acting as an USB HID mouse, and sending mouse commands every once in a while. Windows will allow multiple mice and they all control the cursor simultaneously, so this will work.

Here are some answers but you can simply google "usb hid microcontroller", you'll find example for pretty much any microcontroller that has a USB port since making a HID device is a common code example.

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Simpler to change the lockout time, no? If you can't change it yourself, most likely it is set via company policy and you might be violating the policy if you circumvent it.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ This is something to consider, yes. Not all policies are created equal of course, perhaps OP is justified in their particular case, but security is only as strong as the weakest link, and this hack may introduce a link that is just as weak as a post-it with passwords stuck on a monitor... \$\endgroup\$ – Bart van Heukelom May 6 at 14:33

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