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I'm having a hard time understanding Chassis Grounding. From my understanding, the frame of a plane is used for that and all of it can return to the batterie.

Given my understanding, it remains a closed circuit that always has the same number of coulomb (Batteries and Chassis included).

Let's pretend a lightning hit the plane now. Wouldn't that add coulomb to the closed circuit? If so, is there a limit of coulomb we can add to the frame? Are we recharging the battery?

Then, isn't that new amount of charge in excess to the batterie circuit capacity? Is it why we sometime get a static shock when getting off our car?

It seems like a lot of question, but those questions all explore one aspect: what happens to closed circuit charge once the lightning hit to the moment the charge returns to normal? It could also be charge accumulated from air friction, I'm curious to what happens to the new charge added to the circuit since I'm used to closed circuit.

Thanks in advance

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    \$\begingroup\$ Go study Faraday cages. The plane's metal air-frame acts like a Faraday cage. If that doesn't provide an answer, please explain why it doesn't. Maybe draw a picture so that it's clearer. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka May 13 at 12:37
  • \$\begingroup\$ thanks, gonna check it and be back when I'm done reading about it \$\endgroup\$ – Cherry May 13 at 12:47
  • \$\begingroup\$ SO from what I've read about Faraday, I understand that it will take the excess amount of charge, redistribute it equally on the external layer of the cage, however it still doesn't explain what happens to this new amount of charge added, does it stays here forever? \$\endgroup\$ – Cherry May 14 at 13:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Andyaka can you explain or pinpoint me on what to look for? Because i don't understand what ends up happening with the excess charge that distributes on the faraday cage \$\endgroup\$ – Cherry May 17 at 12:21
  • \$\begingroup\$ The charge remains unless it is removed. Charge IS electrons so they remain unless taken away. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka May 17 at 12:30
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An evolving answer

Go study Faraday cages. The plane's metal air-frame acts like a Faraday cage. If that doesn't provide an answer, please explain why it doesn't. Maybe draw a picture so that it's clearer.

SO from what I've read about Faraday, I understand that it will take the excess amount of charge, redistribute it equally on the external layer of the cage, however it still doesn't explain what happens to this new amount of charge added, does it stays here forever?

The charge remains unless it is removed. Charge is electrons so they remain unless taken away.

This is starting to pinpoint my problem, let's say the plane gets hit by many lightning and accumulate the charge, is there a limit to the amount of charge it can accumulate? What will happens if we striker in indefinitely? There must be a limit to how much charges can be accumulated in the faraday cage?

It's voltage would rise until it became the next source of lightning!

oh wow I see! Thx a lot. But some kind of faraday cage must stop charging, like a car with air friction? It probably can't build up charge forever?

Like I said, it eventually produces a lightning strike to earth or some other large mass nearby that didn’t have the same charge on it.

nice!! thx a lot for your time sir. would sure be curious to see a plane discharge like that!

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    \$\begingroup\$ nice I was going to rebuild an answer to close it, thx!! \$\endgroup\$ – Cherry May 19 at 13:42

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