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When there is a potential difference between two points in an electric circuit current flows . Then why does not current flow through an open circuit?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Let me mess you up with what could be your next doubt. Consider a perfect conductor carrying a current from a battery V to a load R. There is current flowing, right? But if the conductor is perfect, it has no resistance, hence no voltage fall across any two points. So, how can current flow without voltage difference? (hint: when you have to cope with infinite and zero quantities, always consider them as limits of very big and very small quantities) \$\endgroup\$ – Sredni Vashtar May 18 at 9:12
  • \$\begingroup\$ And to add to the other answers, if the voltage difference is too large, you can have an electrical breakdown of the medium between the two "ends" of the open circuit and so a temporary circuit where current flows through: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Electric_arc But this is a very specific case. \$\endgroup\$ – DimP May 18 at 11:59
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Because the resistance of an open circuit is infinite. Any voltage divided by infinite resistance will result in zero current.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Oh thanks I got it, that was a really dumb question \$\endgroup\$ – Oneeyedeagle May 18 at 19:34
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Then why does not current flow through an open circuit?

The clue was in your opening sentence: -

When there is a potential difference between two points in an electric \$\color{red}{\text{circuit}}\$ current flows

An open circuit is not a \$\color{red}{\text{circuit}}\$.

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