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I need help laying out an in ground electric dog fence in a square formation with one side of the square not triggering the collar. The issue it that the manufacture says that inorder to do that we need to make a double loop in which the wires are 5 feet apart, that will not work for our property. I'm willing to do any solution, I was thinking about maybe using shielded coax something. I'm sorry if this seems like a nuisance question but I would really appreciate feedback.

I did some research and its a 10kHz system, also i should have specified this originaly but its a PetSafe PIG00-1077. Also we can put the transmitter box pretty much anywhere. Double Loop Diagram on p.9 And as for a diagram of my yard i count find any, but the side we want to not affect the collar is the side yard so its only about 5' wide so if we where to make it a full perimeter the dog would probably not be able to go down the side yard. We also have 2 front gates meaning if we to do a double loop the wire would need to be underground but then we would run into the issue of putting the cable under the driveway.

[![fenceDiagram][1]][1] The red and yellow show where the collar should trigger. The yellow is where the front gates are and the green shows where the collar should not be trigger.

https://imgur.com/a/THyxf4H Also here are some pictures of the sideyard i'm referring to.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Post the manufacturer's layout diagram, it's not clear what a 'double loop' is. \$\endgroup\$ – Neil_UK May 20 at 3:59
  • \$\begingroup\$ Not going to support a question teaching someone how to shock dogs, even if they use the euphemism "Static Correction". \$\endgroup\$ – pipe May 21 at 22:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ I dont meen to be a ass and you can have your own opinion but because of where i live it would be very dangerous if the dog got out of our yard and this is a very good way of training them. Also the collar has different setting one of witch is purely audible. \$\endgroup\$ – Robert Barnett May 22 at 0:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ Your "fence diagram" never seems to have been present. \$\endgroup\$ – Russell McMahon Jun 1 at 22:44
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This type of "fence" is in common use with robot lawnmowers and a typical problem is how to isolate a flower bed and prevent the mower entering that area.

enter image description here

Figure 1. Fencing a flower bed. Note that the bridge between the boundary and the flower bed are in very close proximity and so the current travelling in opposite directions cancels out and the mower doesn't see it. Image source: My Robot Mower.

Unfortunately there isn't a simple way to do this in a manner to leave one side of the loop open. To close the loop each side has to have an odd number of wire runs (1, 3, etc.) and so cancellation can't occur.

One thing I can think of is to use earth rods at each side of the gap to close the loop on the open side. The idea here is that the ground current would be so disperse that it wouldn't be detected by the dog collar. This might work where I live as the ground is continuously damp.

Another possibility is to use the coax solution as you have already considered. I would suspect that any screened cable should do the trick. Alternatively run the standard wire through an earthed metal tube.

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When you want an area with "no shock", that part needs to be made of two wires, twisted together, going in electrically opposite directions. The same 'shock signal' is put on both lines, but since they're reversed, they cancel there.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Try drawing it out. It's not so easy when you want one side of the square open and the "fence" has to be a closed loop. You can only close the loop with an odd number of wire runs so you can't cancel out. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor May 20 at 8:20
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Transistor We have an invisible fence, I'm just telling you how they did it to create a "dead zone". The Coax solution you posed is feasible, but it's effectiveness depends on the frequency (wavelength) the fence operates at (which you haven't specified). Invisible fence, I recall, operates at 60Hz, which would mean a coax shield would have to be miles long to be effective. Can you share any details of your system?? If it's in the 10k's of Hz, it might work. Or maybe we can help you be clever ;) Can you post an actual diagram of your yard, and where you want the 'plug' to be? \$\endgroup\$ – Kyle B May 20 at 15:41
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    \$\begingroup\$ I'm not the OP. I'm the guy with the flower bed answer. (I don't have a loop in my garden either but I have built a Frankenstein robo-mower out of junk motors and a PLC so it's a topic I'm looking into.) \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor May 20 at 16:00
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Transistor Sorry, didn't catch that you're not the OP ;) Your dual-ground rod thought is clever. One thing about it however, since you're passing current through it, the rods are gonna corrode. Remember current travel through aqueous solution (damp ground) is by ion flow, not free electrons like in a metal conductor. However it's an AC signal, so maybe it's mitigated. Let us know how it works out! \$\endgroup\$ – Kyle B May 20 at 16:28
  • \$\begingroup\$ BTW I add some more information to my question. \$\endgroup\$ – Robert Barnett May 21 at 18:00

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