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I was watching this video https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ep3D_LC2UzU and I noticed that closer to the end he is probing the upper half of the circuit and the scope is displaying square waves , also on the lower side his diagram shows one can take off DC. start about 14 min in the video you can see it on the board.

Also a separate question, can a CW multiplier be used to step up voltage pulses where one would input a lower voltage pulse and get out a higher one? Or do the capacitors in the circuit spread out the pulse and flatten its steep rise time?

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The output of a Cockroft-Walton generator is DC and it takes a while (many cycles) to build up.

See this undergrad thesis, for example:

enter image description here

If you want to generate really high voltage pulses, you can use a Marx generator.

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A CW multiplier is used (along with a power oscillator) to step-up a DC voltage from a lower voltage to a higher voltage. It produces DC on its "normal" output but on each stage there will be a pulsing waveform superimposed on the previous stage's DC output.

The pulse remains the same amplitude throughout all the stages except for accumulated diode drops and therefore, it has a tendency to become slightly smaller in amplitude as it passes from stage to stage.

enter image description here

Picture from here.

can a CW multiplier be used to step up voltage pulses where one would input a lower voltage pulse and get out a higher one?

No. Dave has the explanation.

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    \$\begingroup\$ Er, maybe you meant step up an AC voltage? And a Marx generator can make pulses. \$\endgroup\$ – hacktastical May 24 at 17:09
  • \$\begingroup\$ @hacktastical is that comment meant for me? \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka May 24 at 17:51
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    \$\begingroup\$ Yes. A CW multiplier needs AC input to do its thing. \$\endgroup\$ – hacktastical May 24 at 18:03
  • \$\begingroup\$ Ok I see your point. \$\endgroup\$ – Andy aka May 24 at 18:54

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