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I have looked into using 12v linear voltage regulators, coming down from 16V, i need 2 amps and the regulator is only rated for 1.5A (7812 linear voltage regulator) i am looking for a solution for getting 2A through the regulator. my fan is 1.68A rated at 12V and i'd like a little more than that.

can a buck do it? Other linear voltage regulators rated for more amperage?

Thanks!

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Too much current for a linear regulator. \$\endgroup\$ – DKNguyen May 24 at 19:10
  • \$\begingroup\$ yes , my understanding is that it is at the maximum, even with a heatsink. \$\endgroup\$ – kennethmods May 24 at 19:13
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A linear regulator would waste 8W which is quite a bit, so a buck regulator would be much better.

A buck regulator module based on Xlsemi's XL4016 would do the job nicely with plenty of margin, you can find inexpensive modules on eBay, Aliexpress etc.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ i appareciate the answer - oging to check it out \$\endgroup\$ – kennethmods May 24 at 19:14
  • \$\begingroup\$ current limit as i understand the datasheets is 10A. this is perfect for this application and several others, Cheers! \$\endgroup\$ – kennethmods May 24 at 19:16
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    \$\begingroup\$ The datasheet shows 6A @12V. 10A is the switch current limit at 25°C. If the duty cycle is 50% the output current is then limited to 5A. I think they're probably good for 2,3,4, even 5A with reasonable margin, but one can crank the numbers through including thermal factors and see what the datasheet actually promises. \$\endgroup\$ – Spehro Pefhany May 24 at 19:22

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