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I have a simple circuit. My computer controls an SSR via a 3v dc signal. The load is from a VAC transformer transmitting 10v ac. When "off" I am measuring ~3v coming from the SSR using a multimeter. I have no (literally no) good experience with electricity so I hope I'm using the right terms.

This is for biological research. The end goal is that I can deliver a 1 sec, 5v shock (just enough to be uncomfortable) to a fish upon signal from the computer. What I do not want is for the poor fish to be mildly shocked continuously for the duration of a session.

Is there a way to get rid of the leakage? I don't know if a elctromagnetic switch will work because I might not have enough voltage coming from my computer output to drive it.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Please post a link to the datasheet for your SSR. Also, how exactly is your computer controlling the SSR? If you could use the built-in schematic editor to post a schematic of how you have everything hooked up, you might get better answers. Just edit your original question. \$\endgroup\$ May 25 '20 at 22:19
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Firstly, Shock isn't due to voltage but due to current. check this

Now coming to the circuit. From your explanation, I am sure if the multimeter is connected to the load terminal of SSR or the input terminal

Assuming it's on the load terminal, even if the SSR is deactivated then the SSR load terminal will have some voltage at your terminal and you cannot judge an SSR using voltage. Typically, current flows when the voltage is zero across the SSR and this cannot be validated until there is a valid load for it

Try to googling for Datasheet of the SSR you have. It will specify about the leakage current of the SSR. That should be your judging criteria

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thank you. I ave the multimeter on the postivie wire coming from the VAC and the negative wire coming from the SSR (i.e., the wires delivering the shock). \$\endgroup\$
    – brc
    May 25 '20 at 12:43
  • \$\begingroup\$ then my answer suits your connection \$\endgroup\$ May 26 '20 at 12:20

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