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So i was wondering if i could use this certified UL power supply that is rated at 500mA for my fan that runs at 1.68A load. Will it cause problems? OR does it just not power on (i think thats what its going to do)

it may be helpful to reference what the power supply is designed to do if more amperage than its able to output is demanded

it is of course, inefficient, if it does turn on. I mean this as an experiment.

thanks

EDIT: it's an older AC adapter for something i no longer have. this is a link of its data information, it lists some protections. Searching google i was unable to find a corresponding datasheet. https://www.amazon.com/PK-Power-Adapter-SCP41-120500-Transformer/dp/B06XJC5362 it is a SCP41-120500 Class 2 Transformer Power Supply 12VDC

at any rate, i chopped the end off of this power supply, plugged it in and used a multimeter to check its voltage output. It is reading at 16V? i am using the multimeter correctly. enter image description here

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    \$\begingroup\$ It depends on the design of the power supply. Most power supply will shut down or fail. Some may reduce the voltage to limit the current. That will make the fan slow down. \$\endgroup\$ – Charles Cowie May 24 at 22:45
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    \$\begingroup\$ "... this certified UL power supply .." Which one? Please edit to add link to datasheet. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor May 24 at 22:46
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    \$\begingroup\$ Well, if the fan is actually going to use 1.68A, then you should find a different supply. If you want to hook it up and see what happens, go for it. It is fun to experiment. In general I would not expect a 1 Amp supply to be capable of supplying 1.68A without problems. But I don't know if that is the fans actual current consumption or some kind of worst case maximum or what. Often, with DC fans, if you lower the voltage a bit the current will drop too. So running a 12V fan at 9V will result in much lower current. And less power and less airflow. \$\endgroup\$ – mkeith May 24 at 23:02
  • \$\begingroup\$ I don't think it is unusual for a power supply to have a high output voltage with no load. The product description says it has over-current and short-circuit protection, That probably means it will shut itself off when the fan is connected. If you connect the fan before plugging it in, it may not shut off quite as quickly. It might work with the fan, but I don't think that is very likely. The fan motor should not damage the power supply, but we know nothing about that. If the motor is electronically commutated, there might be a little more chance it could be damaged. \$\endgroup\$ – Charles Cowie May 24 at 23:52
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I plugged it all in - by the way, the power supply is only 500mA at 12V. The fan was pushing so much air! this is the datasheet, it's a beast of a fan - i pulled it out of a server. https://www.digikey.com/htmldatasheets/production/2084948/0/0/1/pfc0612de-f00-spec.html rated for 1.4-1.6A. seems to have been working all right, may be to the same capacity as it was before. only thing was the power supply was warm to the touch after it was on for 5 minutes.i mean warm to the touch

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    \$\begingroup\$ granting that it has continued to get warmer on the outside, even after it has been unplugged i am going to assume that the components inside are hot, and in time the components would burn out. I dont know, and am not going to test. \$\endgroup\$ – kennethmods May 25 at 1:57

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