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I want to connect a 15 pin vga output from a computer to a TV input. However I do not want any data from the TV sent back to the computer. What I mean is that I do NOT want the TV to be a smart monitor but rather a dumb one. In other words the communication will be half duplex one way (from computer towards monitor ONLY).

I looked at the pin outs & I suspect pin 12 could be the problem as it is named bi-directional data. I am not sure if this is or this is NOT the ONLY problem pin. But just wondering.

Also I am not sure how a typical cable (15 pin) is connected. Of course I could open the connector and look inside but if you know the pinout diagram anyway, there is no need to do that. I googled and it shows 15 pin several connections such as one for RGB or one for VGA and this is why I am not sure.

My dilemma is that this is a high security computer and if the computer detects any feedback from the monitor, because that info gets sent back to the server and I am screwed for security violation bigtime & I do not want to get written up or even fired LOL

Of course I can buy a dumb monitor but since I have two extra TV's I want to rather use them. These are just new digital TVs but not so new as these are not smart TVs like a WIFI-TV or roku TV or something.

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    \$\begingroup\$ "Half duplex" doesn't mean what you think it does. The term you're looking for is "simplex". \$\endgroup\$ – Dave Tweed May 26 '20 at 3:39
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    \$\begingroup\$ To get any useful display you're going to have to tell the PC's operating system and video drivers about the fact that a monitor is connected, and what sort of display mode it supports. Typically this is done via an I2C like protocol over two wires on the VGA cable, though there can be ways to force a mode without that. But either way, to get a useful display you are going to have to do things that sufficiently detailed monitoring software could see. So this is really an issue where you need to work out a solution with your employer, not a technical problem. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton May 26 '20 at 3:47
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    \$\begingroup\$ Get a useful display by any means and that fact will be known to system logs and system log monitors. You have a people problem, not a technical problem. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton May 26 '20 at 4:23
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    \$\begingroup\$ Your question makes no sense - why do you think a computer monitor would be permitted and a TV not? You seem to be imagining a difference which simply is not there as something that correlates to TVs vs monitors. As before, you need to pursue this with your employer, it is not a technical problem but rather one of policy - if there even is a problem at all. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton May 26 '20 at 4:57
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    \$\begingroup\$ The solution is simple, ask Security for permission to use a different monitor. If they say it's OK, do it. If not, don't. I could tell you how to 'hack' the cable to get around possible security restrictions, but I don't want to be responsible for what they might do to you when they find out... \$\endgroup\$ – Bruce Abbott May 26 '20 at 6:17
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A standard PC will use that bidirectional data pin for detecting display presence and for determining what resolutions it supports. If you omit that pin, the PC most likely is not able to even detect when the display gets plugged in, or if it can detect that, it won't be able to determine what resolutions it supports. So most likely, there will be no picture. Not unless you have a professional video card whose drivers support forcing the interface enabled with fixed resolution, so it will output a picture even if display is not present.

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