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I see diagrams of a current being generated in a loop or square-ish section of wire that is rotating between two magnetic poles... a north on one side and a south on the other...

BUT, the current direction is sometimes portrayed as being from the North to the South, and other times vice versa...

I assume this has to do with some diagrams still going by 'conventional current' instead of true current...

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    \$\begingroup\$ What do you mean by still going by conventional current? \$\endgroup\$
    – The Photon
    Jun 9, 2020 at 23:19
  • \$\begingroup\$ Hint to your actual question: suppose you change the direction you wound the wire loop... \$\endgroup\$
    – The Photon
    Jun 9, 2020 at 23:21
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    \$\begingroup\$ The right hand rule applies. \$\endgroup\$ Jun 9, 2020 at 23:38
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    \$\begingroup\$ Left- and right-hand rules explained here. \$\endgroup\$
    – Dave Tweed
    Jun 9, 2020 at 23:46
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    \$\begingroup\$ Current does not flow North to South, or South to North, that's what the magnetic field does. Current flows at right angles to the field. \$\endgroup\$
    – Neil_UK
    Jun 10, 2020 at 6:35

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Look up 'Fleming's Right Hand Rule'.

The direction of current induced in the conductor is decided by the direction of the magnetic field and the direction of movement of the conductor.

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