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The question that I'm trying to understand is the following:

In any series RC circuit that is in steady state, WHEN any of the elements changes (R, C, or applied voltage), the following will happen to the circuit:

(A) The circuit will briefly operate in steady state then gradually go on a transient state.

(B) The circuit will immediately go on a transient state then reach a steady state.

(C) The circuit will immediately go to a transient state.

My answer is B since, according to the textbook, the transient response is a circuit's temporary response that will die out with time and the steady-state response stays for a long time after an external excitation is applied. Now, is that external excitation include changes in any of the circuit elements?

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    \$\begingroup\$ WHEN any of the elements (R, C, or applied voltage) what? when they do what? \$\endgroup\$
    – Andy aka
    Jun 19, 2020 at 13:01
  • \$\begingroup\$ @Andyaka, when they 'change.' Sorry, I edited the question already. \$\endgroup\$
    – romeoPH
    Jun 19, 2020 at 13:14

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My answer is B

It all depends how they change - if they change to a new static value(s) then "B" is the answer. If they change and continue to change then "C" might be the answer.

My answer is B since, according to the textbook, the transient response is a circuit's temporary response that will die out with time and the steady-state response stays for a long time after an external excitation is applied.

Then there's the consideration of AC transient response.

If the input voltage becomes a sinewave i.e. is continuously changing sinusoidally, then the AC response on the output has a transient response leading to a non-static steady-state response because, the output will also "become" a sinewave (with phase shift) after the transient response has died down.

So, it all depends what you mean.

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