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I'm normally using in my circuit board a 10K variable resistor. Those specific 10k variable resistors are no longer in my supplier stock for now and I was wondering if I can place a 200k variable resistor instead of the 10k one and tune it accordingly?

I also want to understand the meaning behind the resistance value of each variable resistor: does it mean that this resistance value is the resistance threshold? Or is like the minimum resistance that you can get from it?

Still confusing for me.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Variable resistors have more specifications than only resistance. For example they can linear or logarithmic. So be sure new one have all specifications you need. \$\endgroup\$
    – Rokta
    Jun 23, 2020 at 7:43

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That's generally a bad idea unless you fully understand the circuit.

Just find a way to bodge in a 10K pot of some other type (pretty much the most common value).

Going up by 20:1 has an excellent chance of invoking unpleasant side effects such as drift or excessively touchy and unstable setting, depending on the circuit.

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Variable resistors come in two flavors: potentiometers (3-terminals) and rheostats (2 terminals). The ohm specification of the variable resistor would be the resistance of the resistive element. On a potentiometer, this would be the resistance seen between the two outer terminals. On a rheostat, this would be the maximum resistance you can achieve between the two terminals.

Changing from a 10k resistor to a 200k resistor may or may not work, depending on how it is used in the circuit.

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