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I'm working on a project that uses the SN74HC595N shift register from TI. The nature of this project requires that I solder on pin extensions. My soldering skills are not too solid, so I'm worried that I may be damaging it (based on it's performance, I'm pretty sure that I am).

I know that the operational temperature is -40°C ~ 85°C

My question. How hot can this shift register get before it sustains permanent damage. And is improper soldering the likely cause of the shift register's malfunction as I presume?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ If you are really worried about your soldering skills, then practice a little bit. At the point where you need less than 2 seconds for a solder joint there should not be any problem. \$\endgroup\$ – 0x6d64 Dec 6 '12 at 22:30
  • \$\begingroup\$ Breaking the rules means the result is without any process certification, but it's actually pretty rare to damage ICs by overheating with a soldering iron. If it is behaving oddly, have you considering clock glitches? What are you clocking it with? \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Dec 8 '12 at 5:23
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150C is the maximum storage temperature, according to the data sheet. If you keep it below that you should be OK. It shouldn't get that hot with proper soldering techniques.

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I am unsure of what "pin extensions" is, but, generally, you should be using sockets for all your ICs up until production run. Advantages include:

  • while soldering, you heat the socket, not the IC
  • if/when the IC burns out or is damaged otherwise, it takes 5 seconds to replace it

enter image description here

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I haven't used this chip in particular, but I have heated PIC's with multiple cycles of 500°C for up to 2 minutes, with no sign of damage...

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when I'm soldering that kind of things, I normally connect a crocodile clip to the pin on other side of the pcb. So that clip will work as a heat sink and absorb heat and avoid damaging the component.

EDIT: Either you use a crocrodile clip or use a precise dynamic heat controlled soldering iron, there still a chance that you damage the chip due to ESD. So soldering it is not a good idea in a DIY environment.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ So if soldering in DIY environment is not a good idea, when exactly is soldering a good idea? Heatsinking a pin seems to be the exact opposite logic to thermal reliefs being created at PCB pads, to prevent the heat during soldering from being conducted away. \$\endgroup\$ – ExcitingProjects Dec 10 '12 at 9:54
  • \$\begingroup\$ I have been given this advice also. Hold the pin, next to the chip body with pliers while soldering, to protect the silicone. I have never used it, though, multiple resolders never damaged anything for me. \$\endgroup\$ – Vorac Dec 10 '12 at 11:23

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