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In an audio system, with an AC coupled signal into an op-amp with unity or low gain, does input offset voltage reduce usable dynamic range?

For example, if a TL071 has an offset voltage of 1mV, and my average AC audio signal is 10mV, are quiet parts of the signal effectively lost?

Google has been unclear, but it seems reasonable to me that any AC signal within the offset voltage band would be nulled out.

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In effect, the offset voltage is like a little battery in series with one of the input pins of the op-amp. This means that it's like adding a little bit of DC offset to the AC signal from your audio source. That offset just adds to the AC signal and gets amplified by the op-amp just as the AC is amplified.

does input offset voltage reduce usable dynamic range?

Potentially it can slightly reduce the dynamic range of the output signal of an amplifier if, that amplifier is DC coupled through all its stages. For instance, consider that there is an amplification chain that converts the 10 mV p-p signal into 10 volts p-p for feeding to a speaker. The output would normally peak at +5 volts and trough at -5 volts (10 volts p-p) but, with an offset of 1 mV at the input and the same amplification (1000) the peak positive output would be +6 volts falling to a trough of only -4 volts.

By itself that isn't a problem but output clipping might begin at +/- 5 volts due to limited power supply rails hence, the top of the +6 volt signal would be clipped. This is regarded as a dynamic range restriction.

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No, the signal is not lost, it will just change the DC offset.

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