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If I can name 3.3 kilo-ohm resistor as 3k3, then can I name 4.7 micro farad capacitor as 4μ7 in my schematic notations?

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    \$\begingroup\$ why not? I don't see anything confusing or misleading. \$\endgroup\$ – tlfong01 Jul 27 '20 at 14:35
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    \$\begingroup\$ Yes, use "u" for micro, but also "n" for nano, and "p" for pico. Avoid using "f" for femto - it is confusing. \$\endgroup\$ – glen_geek Jul 27 '20 at 14:57
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    \$\begingroup\$ just dont confuse old style notation of 4m was actually 4u \$\endgroup\$ – Tony Stewart EE75 Jul 27 '20 at 15:24
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    \$\begingroup\$ Small 'k' for kilo and electrical units named after a person have their symbols capitalised but are lowercase when spelled out so 'V' for volt, 'A' for ampere, \$\Omega\$ for ohm, 'k' for kelvin, etc. Fixed. \$\endgroup\$ – Transistor Jul 27 '20 at 15:32
  • \$\begingroup\$ Please consider accepting the answer. \$\endgroup\$ – Rev Mar 18 at 9:56
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Yes, this is very common.

The reason to use this kind of notation is, that it is less error prone. Because you can easily miss the decimal separator if the quality of the a printout (schematic on paper, component labeling etc.) is not optimal.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks for all the answers. But what happens when it comes to Inductance? Is it still 2μ2? \$\endgroup\$ – Nikeboy Jul 27 '20 at 15:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ why not. the key of a schematic is to present to the view of the cct is what it is \$\endgroup\$ – JonRB Jul 27 '20 at 15:55

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