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I have an electronic home organ. I want to play music out loud some of the time, but at night to use headphones so as not to disturb people. The headphone socket works fine, and I could do this just by inserting the headphones whenever I want to use them and removing them when not.

However, I think this will eventually wear out the contact on not just the headphones (which I can replace) but on the socket itself. I tried putting in the socket a male to female converter jack, which I can then plug the headphones into and remove without any friction on the main organ socket.

The problem with this, however, is that when the converter jack it is in the socket the organ "thinks" it should be playing through the headphones and so does not play through its main speakers.

Does anyone know of any device or workaround that could help?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Realistically the options are to fix it when it breaks, or to take it apart now and defeat the switch and or wire in something else that makes the switch and jack discrete. But questions on the usage, repair and modification of finished products are not on topic here unless they are supported by design-equivalent detail of the subsystem being repaired or modified, which is typically not available for most products. \$\endgroup\$ – Chris Stratton Jul 28 '20 at 17:47
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    \$\begingroup\$ IF the organ is an older model manufactured in the USA, chances are pretty good the headphone jack is of reasonable quality. It should last many thousands of insertion cycles. You can squirt a tiny amount of quality contact cleaner into the front of the jack. Although really ancient, I am particularly fond of a product called "Nutrol" from, I think, MG Chemicals. \$\endgroup\$ – Dwayne Reid Jul 28 '20 at 17:48
  • \$\begingroup\$ You can always choose to replace, or place in parallel, a "high use" connector system. One that is designed at the outset for continual insertion and removal events. I'd look for the plug/jacks used by "switchboard operators" prior to the invention of the automatic dialer. Those things took a beating. Not sure if anyone makes something like that, these days, though. So just a thought. \$\endgroup\$ – jonk Jul 28 '20 at 17:52
  • \$\begingroup\$ Thanks all for the answers. I thought some device might exist to solve this, but I guess it's not a common enough problem for something off the shelf to exist! \$\endgroup\$ – PaulT Jul 28 '20 at 17:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ The feature is common, usually it is not a problem, and it is just not solvable by a device you can plug in. Unless that device happens to be an audio mixer or switch, where you can connect both headphones and an amplifer with speakers at the same time. \$\endgroup\$ – Justme Jul 28 '20 at 18:37
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Probably not without opening it and changing the wiring a bit, which would be equivalent to repairing it.

Here is what a typical headphone jack looks like from a circuit point of view. Note that the wires to the speaker are not externally accessible.

enter image description here

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