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Any Lithium battery experts here? My concern is that there is a lot of work and specialized chips on BMS systems that specialize in balancing battery cells for large batteries. Lets say I have a lifepo4 battery with 480 cells for 76.8V and is configured at 20p24s. Why do they configure it that way instead of lets say all 480 cells in parallel for a 3.2v and then a boost converter. I'm exaggerating here with the 3.2 volts, but why not 12v and then put a second stage for boost?

Max current draw seems to continue to increase due to new cell designs.

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Because converters (both step up and step down) are complex, finicky to design, expensive, take up space, generate noise, generate heat, are sensitive to loading, and are inefficient. Converters aren't magic.

Converters for high power are even more finicky to design, and even more expensive, and large, and generate lots of heat so need large, expensive components.

And for your example with 480 cells in parallel: where are you going to get the huge, expensive, heavy wire to carry all the current?

In other words, why would you NOT just re-arrange your cell configuration so you don't need a converter?

You never want to regulate large amounts of power if you don't have to. Cut out the middleman.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ I think you're thinking of transformers. I'm thinking more of switching power supplies. \$\endgroup\$
    – Sam
    Jul 30 '20 at 22:41
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    \$\begingroup\$ What, in anything I said, lead you to think I am talking about transformers? Also, you are mistaken if you think transformers are less efficient than switching power supplies. \$\endgroup\$
    – DKNguyen
    Jul 30 '20 at 22:41

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