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I am new to electronics, and I don't understand the theory of a Short Circuit.

Why does a Short Circuit happen?

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    \$\begingroup\$ Please google around first and do some reading, then come back and ask us specifically what it is about the theory that you do not understand. \$\endgroup\$ – DKNguyen Aug 3 '20 at 15:17
  • \$\begingroup\$ I would start with V=IR and output impedance or resistance of a source/battery. \$\endgroup\$ – DKNguyen Aug 3 '20 at 15:34
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    \$\begingroup\$ Fumble-fingers holding screwdrivers. \$\endgroup\$ – jonk Aug 3 '20 at 17:11
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There is no "theory of a short circuit".

A short circuit is usually just an unwanted connection between two points in a circuit. A short circuit may be caused by the insulation on wires wearing away as the wires rub on each other. On a circuit board, a short may be caused by a blob of solder in the wrong place.

Sometimes, we intentionally "short" things while doing tests on a circuit. For example, if we think that a switch may be faulty, we may place a short (a temporary connection) between its terminals to see if that fixes the problem.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ ...I saw once a repairman repairing a flipper. The main fuse (perhaps 10A) kept to blow. He took his pliers and put a short-circuit across the blown fuse, saying "these pliers are more than 10A". Infact, a coil in the flipper blew up with smoke etc etc. He replaced the coil and the repair was done. \$\endgroup\$ – linuxfan says Reinstate Monica Aug 3 '20 at 17:31

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