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I’m trying to replace what I believe to be a glass zener diode which I determined was overloaded in an electronic automobile delay module. Cathode was attached to a PCB (labeled “Z1”) and the anode was soldered directly to one of five “blades" which extends through the module and to the female plug of the module bank. While the diode was a bit damaged, I was able to read alphanumeric codes. They are as follows:

PH 3ZX 79C 35*

I’m fairly certain of accuracy, but the cathode side was charred enough to make any characters illegible if there were any. I don’t think that was the case, though. The “35” could be a “36."

The module is of European manufacture—Pektron.

Any help would be appreciated!

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It is a 36V +/-5% 500mW Zener diode.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ 36V surprises me for an automotive circuit. I was testing this on a bench with a 12V battery and that fried it. Did you mean 3.6V? \$\endgroup\$
    – erich808
    Aug 8 '20 at 17:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ @erich808 36V. A 3.6V unit would be marked 3V6 not 36. \$\endgroup\$ Aug 8 '20 at 17:09

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