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How do I memorize concepts/topics. Considering theres so many things in electronics and its difficult to understand too. Taking a test in a few days and have so much to study

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    \$\begingroup\$ Understand the subjects, then you don't have to memorize as much. Understanding comes from using the concepts. \$\endgroup\$ – JRE Aug 15 '20 at 13:59
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    \$\begingroup\$ I second @JRE’s answer. I remember freaking out about a final exam because there was too much material to review. I focused on the principles and understanding instead of memorizing. That’s the goal of the class anyway. \$\endgroup\$ – Joe Mac Aug 15 '20 at 14:09
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    \$\begingroup\$ I’m voting to close this question because it is a question about learning techniques rather than electronics. \$\endgroup\$ – The Photon Aug 15 '20 at 14:55
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    \$\begingroup\$ @BeatriceUK here is an illustration of the difference between memorizing and understanding ... a child came home from school excited. "daddy, daddy, we learned how to count apples today!" ... "that's wonderful dear. how many oranges are on the table?" ... "don't be silly daddy, we learned how to count apples" ... lol \$\endgroup\$ – jsotola Aug 15 '20 at 16:32
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    \$\begingroup\$ @tlfong01: That wasn't posted as a cheat sheet. It is a prime example of what not to do. The whole thing is nothing but middle school algebra. If you understand what you are working with, then "P=EI", "E=IR", and some simple algebra will get you through. That's how I handled Ohm's law and the power law in school, and to this day. No level of memorisation will replace actually understanding the things you are working with. \$\endgroup\$ – JRE Aug 16 '20 at 15:41
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Being a recent electronics graduate now working as a tech analyst, I always founded that having a clear understanding of any topic in electronics is much more important than memorizing. Because you & I both know how easily the semantics of any topic in the realm of electronics can change with a slight change in the schematics. So, my advice is: Focus more on having a clear understanding of any topic, whether it be theoretical or numerical. Once you have a clear grasp of the main topic in hand (in order get that grasp, go through every resource available to you, but if you are low on time, have some good youtube channels which you know produce accurate content regarding the topic which you are studying). ONLY when you have a clear grasp on the main concept of topic, then start going through slight variation ( and bit tougher problems in case of numerical). Markdown the variations you are unable to solve or understand & try to get help from a friend or professors as soon as possible ( do not wait, be as polite as possible but always try to clear your doubts on any topic ASAP).

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Many topics in engineering are connected by a logical sequence. As you learn each principal, you learn how it logically follows from what you have learned previously.

Many things are explained using diagrams those diagrams are not only useful for your initial understanding but also for remembering. Some you may want to redraw every time you think of them.

Understanding how things work, developing a keen sense of logic, developing and remembering images are important.

In many courses, exams are open-book or provide for the use of a formula page. Knowing where to find information and how to use it is more important than memorizing facts and equations.

It is also important to know how to logically analyze problems.

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