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I'm fairly new to eagle. So far i was unable to figure out how to rotate a selected part in the schematic editor using keyboard shortcuts only. Please, do not answer with suggestions by using the mouse or the context menu, because I'm not a fan of using a mouse. Also you could suggest an alternative EDA-Software, which fulfills common use cases, like "keyboard-shortcuts for basic operations" OR marking "already placed" parts "in a common" way as a favoured/preferred part.

I'm using Windows 10.

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    \$\begingroup\$ EE.SE is intended as a knowledge base for future readers to find information about electronics design related information. While your question about Eagle is perfectly fine, without trying to be rude, this is not really an appropriate place for romantic gestures. \$\endgroup\$ Commented Aug 15, 2020 at 19:10
  • \$\begingroup\$ Andy Aka suggests Ctrl-R rotates. I don't know if he is correct. \$\endgroup\$
    – Russell McMahon
    Commented Aug 17, 2020 at 0:42
  • \$\begingroup\$ @playmobox - I removed your final paragraph. I apologise for doing so BUT it seems most appropriate to do so after considering several aspects. It's certainly not appropriate to the site, but there's more to ir than that which I won't go into here. Good luck in your endeavors :-). \$\endgroup\$
    – Russell McMahon
    Commented Aug 17, 2020 at 0:45
  • \$\begingroup\$ Space & Shift-Space MAY work. || Others suggest CTRL-SPACE & CTRL-SHIFT-SPACE. || \$\endgroup\$
    – Russell McMahon
    Commented Aug 17, 2020 at 1:08

3 Answers 3

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It is possible to acheive the behaviour you wish.

Eagle uses a command based system, and mouse clicks are no different from other commands - they have text based equivalents.

  • Left Click: (@)
  • Right Click: (>@)

You can add additional modifiers for things like shift (s), ctrl (c) and alt (a). So for example, shift+right click would be (>s@).

Coordinates can also be entered using this syntax, replacing @ (current mouse position), with a value such as (>s 1 2) - shift right click at coordinate x=1/y=2 in the current grid units.


Putting this together, you can assign a keyboard shortcut (Options->Assign) for whichever key combination you want, and set the action to perform rotation in one of three ways:

  1. If you want to rotate whichever part you are currently hovering over with the mouse (i.e. have not clicked on yet), you can use the command rotate (@). This will activate the rotate command and immediately click and rotate whichever component or object is at the current cursor location.

  2. If you want to rotate an object you are currently moving - i.e. you've clicked on it with the move command and its currently following the mouse around - you can use the command (>@) which will perform a right click at the mouse location. For the move command this right click performs a rotation of the selected object without letting go of it.

  3. If you want to rotate the current group, you can do the command rotate (>C@) which will CTRL+Right Click with the rotate command, which will rotate the current group.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, this is the way to go. I've added a custom shortcut like mentioned in the other answer which is triggering the command "rotate (>C@)" by pressing CTRL+R. Thank you all. \$\endgroup\$
    – playmobox
    Commented Aug 16, 2020 at 1:58
  • \$\begingroup\$ The final command for the custom keyboard shortcut is: "Rotate (>C@); Group". I added the "Group" command to turn back to the default tool in order to be able to go on with editing the schematic. BTW this has to be done for the pcb layout editor as well... \$\endgroup\$
    – playmobox
    Commented Aug 16, 2020 at 13:07
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Creating EAGLE shortcuts will help you work faster, Setting up shortcuts like these in EAGLE is easy using the Assign Command. To do so, Under the pull down menu Options you will find the ASSIGN command (Figure 1)

Options Drop Down Menu

The following dialog Box will appear (Figure 2)

Dialog Box

To begin the process click on NEW in the Assign dialog box. A series of keystroke options appear: Modifier and an Assign Command field (Figure 3).

NEW Shortcut

For our example, we will create a new assignment (CTRL-R) to run the Rotate command.

enter image description here

Press OK, then OK and now whenever you press Ctrl + R on your keyboard the Rotate command will be activated.

Note that any assignments other than the F Keys needs to include a Modifier such as Alt, Ctrl, or Shift. Also you can use multiple modifier combination with the same letter assignment to do different commands.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Is there a possibility to automatically pass the currently selected part name as an argument, like f. e. "rotate $1"? If not, this suggestion is just selecting the rotation tool, the action itself has anyway to be done by the mouse. \$\endgroup\$
    – playmobox
    Commented Aug 16, 2020 at 1:53
  • \$\begingroup\$ playmobox yes the best way to do so is as @Tom said in his answer, its the first time I notice that this could be done in Eagle. So thanks Tom for sharing this information and Thank you playmobox for letting us the opportunity to learn a new tip in Eagle. \$\endgroup\$
    – ahm_zahran
    Commented Aug 16, 2020 at 17:59
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Yes, you can rotate a part in EAGLE by using only a keyboard. Look for the text box near the top of the screen, to the right of your current position on the schematic. Just type "rotate" followed by enter. On the inspector panel a box will pop up which will allow you to edit the part's angle. Simply change the value of that and you'll be set.

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  • \$\begingroup\$ Yes, by selecting target part and using the inspector as mentioned above is working. But by only typing rotate it is not. It is also necessary to add the part name as first argument, so f. e. "rotate JP1", but the yes, your solution is working.... buuuut.... I had the hope that someone will tell me: just select something and press "R"... anyway thx \$\endgroup\$
    – playmobox
    Commented Aug 15, 2020 at 16:07

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