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can you make a lithium battery pack with protected batteries?

I know there is a protection chip put on lithium battery packs, which makes protected batteries in a battery pack unnecessary, but are there any limitations, or dangers of making a battery pack with protected batteries?

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  • \$\begingroup\$ impact, crash, crush \$\endgroup\$ – Tony Stewart Sunnyskyguy EE75 Aug 21 at 22:31
  • \$\begingroup\$ Does that mean that protected lithium batteries are not safe against impact, crash, and crush? please explain. @TonyStewartSunnyskyguyEE75 \$\endgroup\$ – X Builder Aug 22 at 1:50
  • \$\begingroup\$ yes that's what it means \$\endgroup\$ – Tony Stewart Sunnyskyguy EE75 Aug 22 at 2:06
  • \$\begingroup\$ Which has nothing to do with this question. \$\endgroup\$ – Bruce Abbott Aug 22 at 3:41
  • \$\begingroup\$ There is no technical disadvantage in using protected batteries as long as any mechanical restrictions (if there are any) are met. Cost is probably the main driver in using unprotected cells plus a separate BMS. The protected individual cells cannot meet the overall BMS capability BUT the BMS can take over most of the functions of cell protection. Cell protection against gross local short is not usually a BMS feature, but in a battery pack should not be needed on a cell by cell basis. \$\endgroup\$ – Russell McMahon Aug 22 at 11:31
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As others have previously stated in the comments, there is no inherent issue with using a battery protection IC unless the overarching mechanical design of your enclosure is very poor. A more fragile lithium-ion battery with a ribbon cable will still break if somebody rips it out with extreme force. A battery will still catch fire if you puncture it. The majority of purely electrical issues faced with the PCB can be overcome with a battery protection circuit, but you still need to make sure the mechanical design of what you are creating is sufficient for its desired application.

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